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$100 For a Movie Review? I Was Doing That Anyway!

This article was written by in Career and Work. 3 comments.


As part of my 2010 (pronounced “MMX”) goal to publish one entertaining thing a week, I’ve been casting a wide net to find audiences and formats that can showcase my creativity and wit.

(Aside: I’m not yet comfortable with self-promotion, so it’s a little awkward to be referring to myself as witty. But earlier in the week, when I heard the open-mic host say “Our next comic…”, and realize he was referring to me, I was forced to conclude that I’d better get used to it if I want to build an audience. Fortunately, and somewhat ironically, I write for Consumerism Commentary anonymously, so it’s easier.)

A friend of mine turned me onto The Rotten Tomatoes Show, on a cable network called “current”, which reviews movies on a weekly basis, using scores from critics and users of the Rotten Tomatoes Web site. The TV show also solicits video reviews from its viewers, and if any part of your video gets included on the show, you get $100.

I’ll let the co-host of the show explain more, with this week’s requested movies:

For me, this seems a perfect weekly thing to try, because:

  • I need practice shooting video
  • I also need practice enunciating
  • even when I’m alone, I get nervous around microphones and cameras (until after I’ve started speaking, anyway), so I want to make that a habit
  • it relies primarily on good writing and brevity, which is the soul of wit, and which we all need to practice, all the time
  • there’s a chance of getting paid
  • I’ve been reviewing movies concisely online in text form for nearly ten years, anyway
  • it’s national TV!

What I need to decide, though, is if merely submitting a video counts as “publishing something entertaining”. I fear that I could do this on a near-weekly basis (I won’t always want to see one of the three movies they pick), and rest on those laurels, meager as they are.

Hmm.

No, I think I have to set the bar higher and say that it only counts if it gets used on the show. That’ll keep the pressure on to keep creating, and trying new things.

Incidentally, the comedy open mic show went quite well. Since this one only happens monthly, I’m going start calling places to try to book more appearances. Hey, look at that. I used the word “book” as a verb. Maybe I’m getting used to show business, after all.

Updated January 10, 2010 and originally published January 8, 2010. If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the RSS feed or receive daily emails. Follow @ConsumerismComm on Twitter and visit our Facebook page for more updates.

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About the author

Smithee formerly lived primarily on credit cards and the good will of his friends. He is a newbie to personal finance but quickly learning from his past mistakes. You can follow him on Twitter, where his user name is @SmitheeConsumer. View all articles by .

{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

avatar John DeFlumeri Jr

Anytime you can get paid for something you are doing already, it’s a bonanza!

John DeFlumeri Jr

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avatar LeanLifeCoach

“-even when I’m alone, I get nervous around microphones and cameras (until after I’ve started speaking, anyway), so I want to make that a habit
-it relies primarily on good writing and brevity, which is the soul of wit, and which we all need to practice, all the time ”

One of the best things I have ever done is attend the 12 week Dale Carnegie program. It helps you think on you feed, teaches you to speak from the heart and enables you to feel comfortable in any environment.

Good luck!

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avatar tigernicole86 ♦55 (Newbie)

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