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$50 Amazon.com Gift Card Giveaway for May 19

This article was written by in Giveaways. 92 comments.


Hot on the heels on what has likely been the most successful giveaway we’ve done at Consumerism Commentary, today brings another giveaway. Throughout this month, I’m celebrating Giveaway May; every weekday brings something new to reward readers and visitors. Yesterday, we surpassed 1,000 fans of Consumerism Commentary on Facebook. This is a great milestone!

Today’s giveaway may not be as magnificent as an iPad, but it’s still pretty darn good. The winner will enjoy a $50 gift card from Amazon.com. Entering is simple, as you’ll see below.

While I’ve embarked on this project to give back to the Consumerism Commentary community, today begins round 2 of the Chase Community Giving contest this season. Chase will give $2.5 million total to twenty-five charities selected by the public, with a grand prize of $500,000. In order to participate, charitable organizations needed to survive in the top 100 in round 1 of voting and provide a demonstration of their “big idea:” what the organization would do with $500,000.

During round 2, every participant gets five votes, but only one per charitable organization. Just a few minutes ago, I placed my first vote.

In order to vote, you must be a member of Facebook and a fan of Chase Community Giving.

In order to win today’s giveaway, you are not required to vote for a charitable organization in this contest, but I do encourage it. Today’s requirement is only commenting on this article on Consumerism Commentary answering this question:

What is your “big idea” — what would you do with $500,000?

Your answer could address your family needs, such as moving to a house where your kids might get a better education, a need for society, such as opening a soup kitchen or donating to your favorite charity, or a personal development need, such as getting your business off the ground. Be creative. Think about it. Answer the question here.

Just like all the giveaways on Consumerism Commentary, in order to win, you must also qualify under the guidelines included in the Giveaway May introduction. Your comment must be posted before 11:59 PM Eastern Time on May 19, 2011.

Published or updated May 19, 2011. If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the RSS feed or receive daily emails. Follow @ConsumerismComm on Twitter and visit our Facebook page for more updates.

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About the author

Luke Landes, also known as Flexo, is the founder of Consumerism Commentary. He has been blogging and writing for the internet since 1995 and has been building online communities since 1991. Find out more about him and follow Luke Landes on Twitter. View all articles by .

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{ 92 comments… read them below or add one }

avatar Jamie Brigham

I would buy a house with 500,000 and giveaway money to Saint Jude’s children’s hospital, The local food bank, abused and battered women etc…These are all so important to me and there are many others so I would give money to these charities

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avatar Thomas Shaffer

pay of the house & student loans. Create a yearly scholarship fund for my alma mater. Try to restart my hearing fund charity.

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avatar Shane Ede

I would give some of it away, but most would go towards buying a new house, paying off bills, then setting up a partial fund for supporting a different occupation.

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avatar kay

with $500,000 I would honestly use half to see an educational investment club for inner city teenagers and invest the rest.

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avatar Lynda Tsai

i’m a registered dietitian so i would want to open up a nutrition center for kids where they can learn about nutrition and fitness but also incorporate adults too. there would also be a garden at the side.

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avatar Darryl Lee

$500,000 — wow. Ok, trip to the financial advisor. Sizable donation to our church, my son’s charter school, local public radio station, other causes that I’ve neglected over the past couple of years. College fund for the two boys. Hrm, do I still have any left? New roof. Rip out dead front lawn and landscape.

There must be some cool startup I could throw some money at. Start taking meetings at Buck’s. ;-}

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avatar Azlan A

I would take a world trip.

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avatar Mila

Probably paying debt and fund my mom’s cookie/food biz

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avatar rewards ♦31 (Newbie)

Seed an endowment for scholarships to a local community college.

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avatar Brian Lauderdale

I would pay off the house.

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avatar Katy

I like Chase Community Giving on Facebook :)

With 500,000 dollars, I would first finish paying off our house. It is the only “debt” we have. I would probably, then, pay off any debt my inlaws and my parents have with their businesses. As selfish as this may seem, I would probably use some of the money to fix up around my home, a bit….and then I would give money to a few of the families in Alabama who lost *everything* due to the recent tornadoes that ripped through their area.

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avatar Ally Ha

I’d pay off the house, set up a college fund for my sister, and start a scholarship at my high school.

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avatar AH

I would pay off my student loans and purchase a home. I would then use what is left to start an annual scholarship for graduating high school seniors from my old hometown.

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avatar David Pleimann

I would pay off the house and all other loans.

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avatar Josh

I love fitness so with 500,000 dollars I would open a Crossfit gym and help people stay healthy.

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avatar Jill Hayes

I would purchase a franchise or finance a business for my son so that he could have his own business and be self-sufficient for the rest of his life and not have to work for someone else.

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avatar Geoff

I would set-up a trust for my parents, so they wouldn’t have to worry about retirement, and my nieces, so they wouldn’t have to worry about student loans.

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avatar Elizabeth Sechrist

I’d use the money to buy my husband and I a home (outright), maybe take a vacation, and then save / invest the rest. I’d love to not have a mortgage!!

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avatar Bobka ♦13 (Newbie)

I would invest most of it to bolster my retirement savings and give the remainder to our local community hospital’s cancer center.

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avatar Andrea

I could go through $500k pretty easily. For myself, I would pay off my remaining debt, max out my Roth IRA, save a year’s salary in my emergency fund, and finish my basement. Then I would pay off my parents’ mortgage and invest some for my son’s college education.

This may sound nuts, but I would love to give the rest away in chunks to perfect strangers. I’d like to just walk up to some woman in the grocery store and hand her $10,000 to see the look on her face. Or leave a $5000 tip for a waitress. Go to the local insurance office and prepay some policies for a year. I think that would be the most awesome way to use the rest of the money!

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avatar Rust Hawk

With 500K, I would choose to buy a house and secure my living situation into my old age. I would also pay for my kids’ education.

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avatar Tamila

I would use part of the 500k to pay off the rest of our mortgage (abt120,000) and donate the rest to http://www.gems-girls.org/, a organization set up for victims of human trafficking in the united states.

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avatar Patrick

With $500,000 I would invest in an online company which sold green items. Similar to csnstores.com where the prices are lower because they have large warehouses for storage – and efficient setup. The difference would be it would be all of the best rated ‘green’ items.

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avatar Liz

With 500K, I’d probably split it up: 100K to each parent, 100K to seed a research scholarship fund, and 50K to each of paying off my school and car debt (combined); seeding a house with land; paying off sister’s school loans; and retirement savings.

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avatar SLPK

I would give 1/5 to a local sober-living facility that I volunteer at, 1/5 to the National Psoriasis Foundation, 1/5 to the National Arthritis Foundation, 1/5 towards our home and 1/5 to retirement.

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avatar Von

If I received $500,000 I would first, pay off my house which is about $200K. The rest I would put towards my retirement and continue living as I have.

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avatar Abi

With that kind of cash we’d probably put it away for the kids college and pay off some debt (cars, credit cards ect.).

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avatar One Frugal Girl

Without a doubt I’d pay off all of my mortgages and start working at a lower paying, more fulfilling job.

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avatar Cindy Dyer

I’d give half of it to our church to help finish the new sanctuary, then I’d use the rest for…I don’t know. Our needs are pretty well covered, but we could always use more retirement savings, right?

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avatar Brandon Barkley

1. Donate at least 10%
2. Pay off all our debts including our house
3. Go on a very nice vacation
4. Invest the remainder
5. Quit my second job

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avatar Steven Owens

I would:
1. Make a 3 month emergency fund
2. Pay off my girlfriend’s student loans
3. Make sure she doesn’t have to take out any more
4. Invest the rest in a relatively safe manner and let it grow for a down payment on a house.

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avatar Jason@LiveRealNow

Easy.

1. Finish paying off our debt.
2. Buy a hobby farm so my wife can have horses and I can have a rifle range.

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avatar Jennifer Perez

I would use it to pay off some debt and the rest would go on therapies for my autistic daughter, they are so expensive and insurance does not cover.

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avatar Adam Myhr

Tithe to the church – $50K.
Pay off all debt including mortgage – $300K.
Kids school funding – $50K x 2.
Emergency fund – $25K.
Invest in hopes of no longer needing to work in 2-5 years – $25K.

After that my wife would be able to choose whether or not to keep working. I think she would ultimately want to work at least part-time. Until we had investments/side jobs/personal businesses paying $60K+ a year we probably need at least one of us to keep working though.

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avatar Matt Targarona

Buy a new house with a bigger bathroom so my wife would be happy & buy a sailboat so I would be happy.

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avatar Meredith

I would use that money to buy a new house!

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avatar Carson

Pay off all debt, then use as seed money to start my own business.

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avatar Elisabeth

Oh wow! I would want to invest some of it, take a trip to Italy with our families and donate some to an eco friendly organization… or start one myself. I can’t even fathom that kind of money! :)

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avatar Erica

My “Big Idea” is several little ideas. I would buy my parents a house, pay off student loans, finance the start of my own photography business, and donate the rest to my local library and Humane Society.

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avatar Leslie @ Frugal Nashville

I’d pay off debts for family, and then donate the rest to flood relief organizations here in Tennessee!

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avatar cam ♦307 (Nickel)

I’d pay off my house, and then I’d start doing pro bono financial counseling for low income people. I’d probably start by focusing on domestic violence shelters and educational presentations in local high schools. Not sure where I’d go from there.

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avatar Ben

I would have to pay off any debts I have and then set up my family with a franchise operation. I know it’s just buying a regular job (and a bit of a headache!) for myself but I see it as a great stepping stone for my kids. If they must succeed off of anyone’s back let it start with mine.

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avatar Salvatore

I would pay off my debts, and then make donations to my college, high school, employer (a nonprofit organization) and to my favorite charity. After all that, I’d want to give money to my brother, a photographer, to spend 3 to 6 months working one of his projects. Then I’d use some to start a company that makes artisinal sausage.

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avatar Crystal Groves

With $500k I would pay off my house/debts, donate to my church, and take care of my disabled father that lives with me.

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avatar Richard H Fleming

I would fulfill my dream of owning my own home and support local food banks.

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avatar Steven Fitzgerald

I know this doesn’t sound like a fun thing to buy, but I would buy “Long Term Health Insurance” to help preserve my assets and those of my family. Any money left over I would use to invest in TIPS and other sound investments for the future of myself and my family. Thank you

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avatar moneymatters ♦357 (Nickel)

I would use part of the money to support missions projects my church is currently doing to feed starving children in Haiti, as well as using it to support local food banks here in my area. 500,000 would go extremely far as $1 can provide around $5 worth of food, according to a food bank near me.

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avatar Liz

I think I would take care of practical things first: pay off student loans (in the 6 figures between my husband and me), put a big down payment on a condo, and put some into savings. Then I’d want to give some to charity and share it with family members. If there was any left, I’d go on a nice relaxing vacation!

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avatar Adriana

I would use this trip on an amazing world-wide trip for underprivileged teenagers. Show them what a beautiful planet we live in, while encouraging them to succeed in life and ALWAYS to give back!

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avatar Sheila Hickmon

I would buy a decent sized house, not crazy big but big enough for my family. Then I would put back 200,000 for my daughter and son’s education and lastly I would buy computers for their school.

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avatar Alex J

Freedom from debt would be my first priority, then I would spend a year pursuing my soccer referee career while trying to figure out what I should do after that.

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avatar Jessica Crotty

First off, I would pay off the mortgage on my fiance’s house. Once that is done, I’d use the rest of the money to renovate the house, which needs a lot of it: totally new electrical wiring, chimney for the furnace, replace rotting deck, get a paved driveway, remove the one dying tree in the backyard… The whole house situation has put my fiance in so much emotional distress (is there going to be an electrical fire? is the furnace properly vented, or are we going to die in our sleep from CO poisoning? etc.), that to be able to take away all the burden and hardship that inheriting the house his father (literally) built has brought him would be amazing.

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avatar Rakesh Arora

I will use the money to pay off my mortgage and other debt, donate some portion of it, and save the remainder for kids education and retirement.

Great giveaway – thanks!

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avatar Javid Beykzadeh

I would pay for a new roof for our house, it’s not going to be covered by our insurer:( The rest I would help my grandmother pay off her house and the rest invest into a college fund for my future children.

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avatar Beth

I would open a halfway house for women alcoholics.

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avatar cyborg90

I will buy a nice home for me and my family. And some donations and I also need a dashing car. It will also help me in my studies.

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avatar JD

I would pay off remaining debt, fund IRAs for my family, pay college expenses for my 2 sons, & donate to my church.

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avatar Donna Freedman

My first order of business would be to set aside the taxes I’d need to pay on such a huge windfall. (I’m practical that way.)
Next: Buy a house for my daughter and her husband, both of whom are disabled.
Second: Buy a house for my niece, who has two kids under age 9 and is going through a divorce.
And if there were anything left? Buy a house for me, or at least use the money as a HUGE down payment.

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avatar DonnaFreedman ♦2,496 (Dollar)

I also have a secret fantasy of what I’d do if someone gave me a million dollars: Buy a small apartment house and rent the units out for $1 per month to women who were leaving abusive situations and needed to get their lives together. I would have experts come in once a month to talk about personal finance, homebuying, continuing education, et al.; residents would be required to attend at least six programs per year. (There’d be really good door prizes, though, so they’d all WANT to attend — especially since I’d be hiring someone to watch any kids that lived there.)
Residence would be limited to four years. If upon move-out a woman had saved enough for a down payment on her own place and had qualified for a home loan, she would get a $5,000 stipend (payable after closing and move-in) to help pad the emergency fund.
Come to think of it, I’d probably need more than a million — especially since I’d need to hire someone full-time to administer the place and the program.
The place would be named “Geneva House,” in honor of my mother.

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avatar Dogfood Provider

I love this vision. If I had a milllion bucks to give away, I’d help you start!

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avatar Kelly Perry

pay off mortgage, replace our vehicles, $$ for a college account for each child, leftovers to our retirement fund! that would be awesome!

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avatar shellye ♦107 (Cent)

I would pay off my mortgage, donate a chunk to a few of my favorite charities, like the Humane Society, Operation Kindness, and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. One of my children is diabetic so I want to help find a cure as soon as possible. I’d also set aside some for retirement, take my dream vacation to Ireland, and make sure my kids graduate from college without any kind of student loans. Not sure what order I’d put those items in, though. :-)

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avatar shellye ♦107 (Cent)

I’d also upgrade my Dallas Mavs season tickets to a platinum suite or courtside. That and my Ireland trip would be my indulgences.

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avatar Dogfood Provider

If I had a $500,000 windfall, I’d place a call to my mom’s CPA right away and figure out how much I needed to pay in taxes. Next, I’d pay off my student loans and credit cards. Then I’d buy my mom the Mustang convertible she wants but is far too practical to buy herself. With the remainder, I’d squirrel away a year’s salary and spend the rest on a house. Around here, that would go really far towards paying for a nice place.

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avatar Tina McDowell

I will buy a nice home for my family

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avatar CC Williams

I’d love to fund local non-profits that help educate underprivileged and at-risk youth.

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avatar Sassy

As a single mom of two kids, working in a dead end job it is stressful. When you have a boss who is seemingly bipolar, it is even harder. I wish I could just quit working for him when he is screaming and cussing at me.
I would pay off my mortgage for starters. I would go to college and get an education, because I work for a construction company and locally construction is a horrible industry to be working in. Job security does not exist. In fact, the only reason I received this job was due to the prior employee moving out of state in a quest to find better work for her family. The boss secretly told her that her job is always open for her, though they have had a bit of “relations” going on. Now she is leaving her husband and I guess I will be bumped out of my job so he can bring her back. :(

So going to college would be high on my priority list, as well as the mortgage payment. Then I would put money aside for my kids to go to college, because I don’t want them to experience this in their lives.

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avatar Robert Farrington

I would pay off my house!

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avatar Claudia Mcgee ♦106 (Cent)

i would buy a house with lots of land and finally make my dream come true and open a Animal Resuce.

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avatar Naomi

This amount invested would enable my husband to retire immediately.

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avatar Erica Douglass

I’d invest almost all of it–some into my business, and some into passive income investments.

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avatar faithfueledbennetts ♦264 (Nickel)

I would use about $5,000 to pay off debts first. Then I would take about $15,000 and buy a safe, comfortable car for my family of 4. Next I would pay off my hubby’s college tuition which would eat up $50,000. I would then use about $130,000 to buy a bit of land and build a country cottage surrounded by wildflowers and the echoing sounds peace. With the remaining $300,000 I would start some sort of non-profit organization to empower young girls & ladies without selling themselves out and educating them on what beauty really means and how it starts in the heart-not on the cover of a magazine or oversexed television show. I think that would deplete my $500,000 quite nicely :)

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avatar Sel

I would get my life back on track by: 1. Paying the federal, state taxes due on my windfall. 2. Putting 10% of the remainder in a tax deferred account. 3. Putting another 10% away for a rainy day. 4. Paying off my husband’s medical bills. 5. Paying off any other debt I owe. Like the relatives who helped us financially until I found my present job. 6. Any remainder would go into the highest yielding liquid account that I could find for a year, so that I could properly plan out my next financial move.

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avatar Rick Zee

I would pay off all of my family’s debt for a fresh start!

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avatar amazingAG

I love to travel. Probably i would spent the whole amount in my travel. And i also love cars so probably will buy a personal car from it. Thanks for the great giveaway.

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avatar Stacy

I’d pay off all of our debt, buy a farm, start a community garden, and go on a shopping spree at Boden. Then I’d go visit friends in India and France. Finally, I would donate to an organization for women’s rights and health. Whew!

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avatar Michelle C.

I would use it towards a down payment for my first property!

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avatar ali

I’d pay off my credit card debt (less than $5000), then I’d give some money to my Mom and brother so they can do some repairs and upgrades on their houses that they really need done. I’d invest a large portion. I’d set up an investment/savings for my nephew for his future.

I’d get evaluated for learning disabilities (I suspect I have some form), and I’d work with a therapist who specializes in adults with ADD (which I know I have) to really get my life in gear. I’d work with a nutritionist and a personal trainer (I’m about 100 lbs over weight). I’d go to college and finally get a degree.

I’d donate money to 2 hospices that helped family members; RAINN, and the Human Rights campaign.

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avatar Coupono Logist

I would buys lots of shoe-strings for myself. Will donate a $1 once a month to some randomly selected charity for up to one calendar year. Clearing up some debt for me and buying a goat for a farmer friend who needs one!

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avatar Janet Fri

I would renovate my home and I would help a children’s charity.

janetfaye (at) gmail (dot) com

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avatar Susan

First I would pay any debts, loans and taxes on the windfall. Second I would ensure a solid, lifelong nest egg for my high-functioning autistic son. Third I would ensure my second son had adequate money for college. Fourth I would start a scholarship fund for local citizens who are pursuing careers in healthcare. Last–I would donate the rest to local charities (food pantry, benevolent society, church outreach programs that work within our community, local public school system, the community foundation, humane society, etc).

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avatar javi ♦80 (Newbie)

I would use that money to have financial freedom. Freedom to choose what I want to do in life and freedom to help others.

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avatar Cejay ♦1,521 (Half-Dollar)

I would help my family especially my brother who has lost everything is now living with us while he works temp jobs. Buy more than that I would devote my time and energy to helping attract companies to my hometown. Too many people are in the same shape as my brother and while they all need help with food, clothing and shelter more than that they need jobs so that they can work and support themselbes.

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avatar Rusty

I would renovate the house. Buy a new car. Go on a very nice vacation. Donate some to local charities. And save some for retirement.

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avatar Debbie Chioffe ♦260 (Nickel)

San Diego is a wonderful place to live. The weather is usually beautiful and there are lots of things to do. It is easy to live here. These reasons and a few more may be why we have such a Homeless issue. Though care has been taken to find programs and shelters, and even to relocate, our Homeless still flock here and want to stay on our streets. If I had this kind of money, my first step would be to help in any and all the ways that I could in my own community. I would build another shelter or two if possible. I would institute programs that would deal with those with addictions and those that have mental and psychological issues, as unfortunately many do. I would give a huge donation to the San Diego YWCA who’s programs and housing help women in transition and battered women immensely everyday. I have personal reasons for helping them as they changed my life 13 years ago. I am not going to spend every penny on those very worthy causes however. I will set some aside for my family, and myself and some of the issues that we have. After all help really does start in our own backyard…literally. I would divide what is left up among other organizations that I support, such as the Humane Society, Breast Cancer Awareness, and The Cancer Society to name only a few. I would also take out one day to totally pamper myself and to buy just a few things that I do not allow myself, or cannot afford now. My day would end with a luxurious bath whose bubbles comprised of bath beads that cost just a bit too much but I liked them simply because of their scent and skin softening qualities. I would pour a glass of merlot or perhaps even champagne ( real champagne, not just sparkleing white) and relax. I would not celebrate with too many monetary things or live too rich because I do not feel right doing that while I am such a champion for the homeless and under-fed. I will breathe a sigh of relief knowing that at least I tried to do my part.

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avatar Philip Burgess

Two chicks at the same time.

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avatar Luke Landes ♦127,380 (Platinum)

I get the Office Space reference, but I’m pretty sure you’ll need $1 million.

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avatar skylog ♦368 (Nickel)

i would take care of some debt, provide some relief for family, donate, take a long needed vacation from life for a short while…then set the rest aside for retirement. i would try to take advantage of my new freedom in my day to day life, but i would not make whole sale changes as i like things how they are at the moment…

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avatar Philip Burgess

My standards are only half as high.

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avatar Janet Janet

I’d write the book that I’ve always wanted to write; I’d do the charity work that I’ve always wanted to do; and I’d take care of my parents and mother-in-law like I’ve always wanted to do.

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avatar Ashley Sullivan

I would pay off all my debt and any debt my parents have, buy a house and put the rest in the bank.

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avatar Dee

I would pay off my unfortunate college debt and my parent’s debt — the rest of the cash I would use towards scholarships for kids trying to pay for college textbooks each semester and just basic savings.

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