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avatar You are viewing an archive of articles by Leigh Mutert. Leigh Mutert, CPA. Leigh is the manager of the H&R Block Get it Right Community, a blog that focuses on breaking down complex topics for taxpayers, and the manager of social media, corporate relations for H&R Block. Mutert was a practicing CPA in the Big-8 and corporate realms before leaving the workforce to raise a family.

Leigh Mutert


About the author: This is a guest article written by Leigh Mutert, CPA. Leigh is the manager of the H&R Block Get it Right Community, a blog that focuses on breaking down complex topics for taxpayers, and the manager of social media, corporate relations for H&R Block. Leigh was a recent guest on the Consumerism Commentary Podcast.

Searching for and starting a new job can cause workers to spend money when they may be short on funds. A bright spot is that some of those expenses may be tax-deductible.

Unemployed and searching for a new job

Taxpayers — particularly the unemployed and underemployed — should file tax returns to claim all tax credits and deductions they are entitled on their tax returns, to ensure they get the largest tax refund they are due.

Remember, all income must be reported to the IRS, regardless of the source. It does not matter if it is from unemployment compensation (all of which is subject to federal income tax this year), tips, a lawn mowing business or working as a nanny.

While looking for a new job, keep good financial records because items used exclusively for the job search are tax-deductible as long as the job is in the same field. Among these expenses are résumé development, professional placement services, and unreimbursed mileage, airfare and hotel expenses for interview travel.

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Moving for a new job

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