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Balance Sheet, September 2005

This article was written by in Monthly Update. 2 comments.


What follows is my personal balance sheet for the end of September, 2005. Thankfully, my net worth has made some gains this month. Some of that was due to increased value in my investment accounts and some was due to receiving three paychecks this month. Since I get paid every other Friday, the calendar rewarded me with a third paycheck yesterday.

Take a look at the report and the explanations below.

Once again, the “Other” cash account represents funds held for me at the university where I am working towards my master’s degree. As classes progress, funds are taken from this account. 90 percent of the class fee is placed in an “Accounts Receivable, Personal” account (my company reimburses that much) and the remaining 10 percent becomes an education expense. It’s possible I’ll have to make some changes to these expenses retroactively.

I’d really love to be maxing out my 401(k), but that’s just about impossible at the moment. I am maxing out my Roth IRA, dollar cost averaging through two monthly payments.

The credit card balance is paid off in full at the end of each statement, but my student loans are being deferred.

Updated July 16, 2010 and originally published October 1, 2005. If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the RSS feed or receive daily emails. Follow @ConsumerismComm on Twitter and visit our Facebook page for more updates.

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About the author

Luke Landes, also known as Flexo, is the founder of Consumerism Commentary. He has been blogging and writing for the internet since 1995 and has been building online communities since 1991. Find out more about him and follow Luke Landes on Twitter. View all articles by .

{ 1 comment }

avatar Mike

I like the method you use of presenting your financials. I also follow the dollar cost averaging method on my RothIRA. It feels good to actually max it out at the end of the year. Good luck on reraching your goals.

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