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If you have any questions for me, I encourage you to go ahead an ask. It’s great to hear from readers, whether it’s to ask a question or challenge me on my opinions. The link to contact me is unfortunately now buried at the very bottom of this website, or you can just click here to send me a message. For financial questions where anonymity might be important, particularly if you have a question about your personal situation and would like me to ask the readers, there is an option to send me a message without providing your personal information. This has come in handy with readers many times.

A question I received recently pertained to my savings accounts. Here it is, from reader Mike:

Do you still have an account with Capital One 360 and their 0.75% APY?

I ask this in a sarcastic manner. Having recently found your article from November 13, 2012 talking about how Capital One was at the time taking over ING Direct and that you did not see enough reason to close your account. Even though a savings account is for protection and not an investment I still find it hard to swallow that all Capital One and the other online savings account sites can only offer a pitiful 0.9% at most.

When I first opened an account at ING Direct, the interest rate was more than 4% APY. Those were good times, at least compared to the world of deposit accounts since the recession. I was earning those higher rates on a much smaller balance than I had at the bank later on, when rates all across the board tanked to below 1%.

Banks offer higher rates on savings accounts to attract customers. But with a facility to borrow money from the Federal Reserve at insanely low rates, close to zero, there’s no incentive to offer higher rates to average depositors like you and me. Experts who watch the Federal Reserve Board believe they may start raising rates, or at least hint at the possibility of raising rates sometime in the future, after the next meeting this month. It could be a long time before banks decide to offer rates on savings accounts that exceed the historical rate of inflation.

Savings is an important part of a household’s financial picture, regardless of the interest rate. Low rates make savings more painful.

Let’s get to my savings accounts, which were the real focus of the question. My last public financial statement was from December 2011 and didn’t include anything in my business accounts. The statement indicated I had $66,531 in savings, and almost all of this was in ING Direct (now Capital One 360) savings accounts. This was technically after the sale of my business (Consumerism Commentary), but I didn’t include any proceeds from the sale in my public balance sheets. But that ING Direct/Capital One 360 account remained roughly the same after the sale.

Since the time of that final balance sheet, I’ve occasionally withdrawn from the savings account, but it is still open. And, in fact, the $17,000 in my Capital One 360 account reflects nearly the totality of my cash savings; everything else is invested. I’ve left my investments alone for the most part, and have been living mostly on the income from the company that purchased Consumerism Commentary. But in order to make that work, I have to occasionally dip into my savings to assist. It’s a better choice than selling investments. Had I planned my taxes a little more carefully, and had I better anticipated what my tax bill would be with the change in investment income rates, I could have kept more cash ready to go, but it didn’t work out that way.

Capital One’s purchase of ING Direct and the resulting Capital One 360 brand have had no impact on the quality of the account. I am certain the interest rate would be the same regardless of the name of the company or the corporate owner.

My account at Capital One 360 has survived the Great Consolidation.

Over the last eleven years, I’ve opened savings accounts at dozens of banks to review the process and the experience of being a customer for readers. I don’t know of many other reviewers who have gone so far to review savings accounts; most reviewers take a look at the terms or the advertising copy and base their reviews on that. Since selling the site, I’ve had no need to continue opening savings accounts across the country and the internet. And I wouldn’t advise most people to have savings accounts at dozens of different banks. So I took some of my own advice and began closing accounts, moving cash to either Capital One 360 or Wells Fargo, the latter of which is where I still having my primary personal and business checking accounts.

That was the Great Consolidation. It took a few years, with the last account (American Express Personal Savings, currently offering 0.8% APY) closed a few weeks ago. Why close American Express when it’s five basis points higher than Capital One 360? It really doesn’t make a difference. Well, it makes a difference of $8.50 a year. Although, I wouldn’t like paying an $8.50 yearly fee for a savings account, the difference in interest earned isn’t that much of a big deal. I’m not chasing rates now — in fact, I never chased rates.

Considering it would take as much effort to close the Capital One 360 account as it would take to close the American Express Personal Savings account, there’s no reason I can give other than habit. I’ve had the Capital One 360 account longer (as ING Direct), and even though it’s no longer the hub for electronic transfers from dozens of other savings accounts, it has made its impression. And despite all the bad customer service stories from Capital One’s credit card division in previous years, none of the bad behavior seems to have leaked to Capital One 360.

I would prefer, however, to keep most of my cash where my investments are. My investments are almost all housed at Vanguard. The investment company offers a money market fund, but over the last few years, the returns haven’t been much better than online savings accounts. In fact, it’s been worse.

The point of the reader’s question seems to be about interest rates. Why stick with Capital One 360 when the rate has been lowered so much? Well, rates everywhere are down. The better options are not better by enough so that it makes too much of a difference. And if the other option is to invest in stocks or real estate rather than keep money in cash, you’re trading liquidity for the chance of income or appreciation, and adding risk on top of that. Savings and investing serve different purposes.

In short, the cash I have currently is almost all in a Capital One 360 account, the continuation of the ING Direct account I’ve had since July 29, 2002. (The Wells Fargo account is a continuation of the one I’ve had since 1993 or so.)

Where do you keep your savings? What’s your favorite savings account today?

If you have more questions for me, contact me now.

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According to a new survey, 63% of Millennials own no credit cards. For this poll, the Millennial generation is defined as those in the United States aged 18 to 29.

The survey, put together by BankRate, attempts to get to the root cause for the lack of penetration of credit cards among this younger demographic, despite the attempts to sell the idea of credit cards to this generation. These attempts mostly come from those older than Millennials. BankRate’s survey points out that each successively older age group is more likely to own multiple credit cards.

Instead of credit cards, Millennials prefer to use debit cards. Despite all the information that’s available that shows how debit cards are worse that credit cards for active use, credit cards aren’t gaining traction. Banks have also spent the last few years making debit cards more attractive by adding rewards and new consumer protections that approach the offerings of credit cards, yet they tend to fall a little short. And they still don’t provide the benefit of building a credit history, something older Millennials have already discovered as they’ve attempted to finance a car or house purchase with a loan or mortgage.

Millennials are tied economically to the recession. In the development of an adult, the age range currently associated with the Millennial generation is when world and political awareness sets in. For Millennials, this came at a time where the events of the world were defined by the economy. This period of maturity included the Great Recession, the credit crunch, significant penalties for the banking industry, new regulations, and banks behaving badly. It’s no surprise those who came to understand the world during this time are wary of banks and the products they push.

That doesn’t explain why credit cards are shunned while debit cards are praised. After all, debit cards are bank products, as well. There must be an element of distrust of debt, not just the banking industry. And that might come from the recession, too, as Millennials saw their older relatives and friends struggle with debt.

On top of this, there are quite a few loud voices in the media who prefer debit cards over credit cards, and even though the reasoning they preach is often faulty, the message contains an aspect of contrarianism that Millennials, as a group, seem to like.

The survey is missing something obvious. The use of credit cards among different age groups isn’t a comparison that makes a lot of sense. We shouldn’t be comparing the 18 to 29 year-olds with today’s older generations. These can be interesting data, but it can’t be used to prove any hypothesis that might be suggested by the survey other than “younger people use and own credit cards less than older people.” The better comparison would be between the use of credit cards among Millennials today and the use of credit cards among other generations when they were the age of today’s Millennials.

That would result in some clearer conclusions. We do know that Millennials today are often entering the workforce with higher student debt loads than any other previous generation. That could be a reason Millennials are wary of anything that has the potential to increase debt, as credit cards might. Debit cards are marketed much more heavily today. They didn’t even exist when some older generations were as young as today’s Millennials. Some of these facts should be considered when trying to determine why Millennials don’t carry credit cards.

In general, as one gets older, one progresses in one’s career and builds more wealth. With more wealth, people will grow more comfortable using financial tools like credit cards. I would be surprised if the situation with Millennials today is much different than the situation with Generation X, twenty years ago. In the 1990s, Generation X was coming of the age where awareness of politics and the world kicks in. There was a recession in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

This is from an article from the Los Angeles Times in 1995:

By graduation, [Michael Puccini from Chapman University] had a wallet full of plastic and was $3,000 in the hole. Plus he owed $13,000 in student loans. Overwhelmed, he moved back home after a tearful phone conversation with his father.

“I had a lot of fun with credit,” says Puccini, 30, who has found work in Los Angeles as a public relations agent. “But I’m really paying for it. It’s kept me from doing a lot of things.”

More than any other generation before them, today’s young adults are emerging from school and beginning their careers weighed down by a heavy burden of debt. And fresh data suggest this burden is growing. A Southern Californian’s average credit card balance increased 20% from 1993 to 1995, according to the market research firm Claritas Inc. But for those in their 20s, the balance jumped 70%, to $2,159 as of Sept. 30.

These numbers may look small compared to what surveys throw around today, but debt at this level was a significant burden at the time. Generation X hasn’t truly recovered, and are not poised to be able to live in retirement the way investing firms advertise and the way many among the generation prior to the Baby Boomers, the Silent Generation, often appears to be able to afford. Generation X clearly took advantage of credit cards as they were marketed to them, and it may have been to their detriment.

Yes, the use of credit cards did allow Generation X to spur one of the greatest runs in the real estate industry by buying town houses, condominiums, and single family homes before they were able to afford it, but Millennials may see the struggle of Generation X today and be familiar with stories of the struggles of Generation X in the early 1990s. If they are, it would make sense that Millennials would try to avoid these problems by avoiding credit cards.

Millennials are also the most educated, in terms of college matriculation and advanced degrees, so there might be some truth to the idea that Millennials, as a group, believe they are smarter and more aware of the world than earlier generations — or at least, they might believe they are smarter today than other generations were when they were in the 18 to 29 age group. And thus, Millennials could feel comfortable keeping their approach to finances different than those who have come before.

I never like to generalize attitudes across large swaths of Americans, but there are definitely measurable trends, even if one can always find anecdotes that contradict those trends.

Should Millennials get with the program and start using credit cards instead of debit cards? I want to say yes. Credit cards are simply better products for consumers. But it’s not that simple. The same BankRate survey shows that when Millennials do use credit cards, they don’t pay the bills in full ever month. Only 40% do, compared to a larger percentage of older age groups. Again, this should be obvious; Millennials haven’t yet built the financial independence or stability through their careers that older people have built. So there’s a lot more Millennials need to do to take control of their finances besides just switching from a debit card to a credit card.

On the other hand, Millennials are in a position to change the way other Millennials relate to their finances. This has already started. Millennials — or in some cases Generation X representative who seem to be in tune with the needs and desires of Millennials — are changing the financial industry. Generation X put the banks online, but Millennials are inventing new ways to bank. Crowdfunding, person-to-person lending, mobile payments, financial advisory without human advisors, and other new technologies will shape how Millennials deal with their finances. If Millennials want to stick with debit cards rather than credit cards, in time, debit cards or some other technology will grow to contain all the features necessary to most benefit the consumers.

It might take some time, but I trust the Millennials to figure it out. If something doesn’t work to the changing needs of a generation as it gets older, that generation will change the industry. It has already begun to happen.

Here’s a story about that recent study about Millennials.

By the way, I found Michael Puccini, the Generation X representative featured in that 1995 Los Angeles Times article. He’s now a freelance writer and publicist, after a career in media publicity.

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Banks typically look for every possible instance to charge customers to fees. That’s why it’s particularly important to stay aware of your bank account balances. With the increasing popularity of automatic payments (outgoing) or automatic withdrawals (pulls), a poorly timed deposit can result in overdraft fees or insufficient funds (NSF) fees. A few years ago, I took a survey of the different ways banks process their customers’ debits and credits, and saw how easily it would be for banks to trap customers treading close to low balances in a maze of fees.

For example, let’s say you have $500 in your checking account at the beginning of the day on September 1. You could have previously written a check for $600 to pay your September rent, you could have an automatic withdrawal using your debit card scheduled for $300 to pay your electricity bill on the first of the month. You go to the bank after work and deposit $500 into your checking account.

Some banks would process the rent check first, generating one overdraft fee of $35. This would be followed by the $300 automatic withdrawal, processed during the ACH batch, but now your balance is a negative $135, so you receive a second overdraft fee and a balance of a negative $470 before your overdraft coverage comes from your savings. Finally, the bank processes your deposit, giving you a balance of $30.

Had the bank processed the deposit first, you would have saved $70. And if the payments were returned rather than covered through overdraft fees, you might have caused problems with your landlord or your electric company. Banks justified these techniques with two specific claims:

  1. Larger withdrawals should be processed first because they usually represent more important payments, like rent and mortgage payments.
  2. There’s no consistent way for banks to know what time an automated transaction is received, and thus most transactions should be processed in batches at night.

Consumer groups have criticized banks for this approach because it isn’t consumer friendly, it’s designed to maximize profits at the expense of customers, and it’s rather easy to improve. And after class-action lawsuits and guidance by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureaus, more banks are improving their procedures.

Wells Fargo is in the process of making some positive changes. Again, I’m a long-term customer of Wells Fargo, or to be more accurate, I’ve been a customer of a string of banks that, through a series of mergers and acquisitions, has ultimately (so far) become the bank known as Wells Fargo.

As of August 11, Wells Fargo no longer posts checks and automatic payment transactions (ACH) from highest to lowest value. Instead, the bank will post transactions based on the date and time the bank receives them. It still isn’t as simple as it sounds. Wells Fargo doesn’t post these transactions immediately. That happens during the same nightly batching process. Each branch has a cut-off time for deposits, but you may not see that cut-off time until you visit the bank or ATM.

Cash deposits and transfers made before the cut-off or after the cut-off and before batch processing begins will be counted as available when other transactions are posted during the batch process. Check deposits might not clear the same day, however. After the any qualifying deposits are posted, Wells Fargo will process debit card purchases, ATM withdrawals, account transfers, online bill payments, and teller-cashed checks based on the time the transaction occurred.

Then, Wells Fargo pays your checks and automatic payments. This is the category that used to be prioritized by value, from high to low. Now these will be processed in the order the instructions were received by the bank, and if no time information is available, they will be processed from low value to high.

Wells Fargo has some additional changes coming in September. More transactions will be considered “pending withdrawals” during the day. Previously, you wouldn’t be aware of pending withdrawals during the day, but now, Wells Fargo will mark them as pending withdrawals as soon as they are received, and reduce your available balance immediately. The withdrawals will still be processed during the nightly batch. If you look online, you’ll be able to see pending withdrawals beginning September 19.

While these changes do reflect some improvements and perhaps some clarity over the old system, there are still certain instances where customers can find themselves with multiple overdraft fees or returned payments.

Even diligent people make mistakes with their financial accounts. But the best way to avoid having to deal with these issues is by taking a sensible approach to account balance maintenance:

  • Know how much money is in your bank account.
  • Don’t write checks or initiate automatic withdrawals using money that isn’t in your account and available today.
  • Keep track of your finances so you don’t have any questions about whether your payments will clear your bank account.
  • Always keep a solid buffer in your checking account. Choose a buffer amount that covers your weekly transaction volume.
  • Set up an alert (with your bank, with Mint.com, with Quicken, or with some other tool) to alert you if your balance is low.

Wouldn’t you know it, I found myself dealing with an overdraft fee recently. Yes, even people who write about personal finance make mistakes. To be honest, as budgeting became less of a necessity for me, I let some of my financial guard down, and haven’t been tracking my finances as closely as I used to. For many years, I looked at Quicken on a daily basis, but I haven’t done so in a while. I’m trying to get in the habit of checking my transactions once a week, but it’s going to take me some time to improve the accuracy of my transactions over the last year or so.

For more information on Wells Fargo’s new posting order policies, you can read this PDF.

Were you ever stymied by the way your bank processed your deposits and withdrawals over the course of one day? Are these changes by Wells Fargo significant improvements?

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Two years ago, Wells Fargo changed its customer agreement, taking away the rights of customers to resolve disputes with the bank through the typical legal process afforded citizens of the United States. Current Wells Fargo customers tacitly or knowingly agreed to sign away these rights in favor of an arbitration system that favors wealthy corporations.

Although I wrote about the change on Consumerism Commentary, changes like these go largely unnoticed and don’t get a lot of attention in the media, even from consumer-focused outlets.

To be honest, I still have personal and business accounts at Wells Fargo. I’m continuing to look for a credit union that is convenient enough for me to move my primary banking. I’ve opened and closed dozens of bank accounts to review the companies for Consumerism Commentary readers, and one of these days, I will close my account at Wells Fargo.

The process of closing a checking or savings account is thankfully straightforward, and Wells Fargo will not make you jump through hoops in order to complete the process. Before you close your account at Wells Fargo, though, be sure to download the latest version of the Bank Switch Kit and Checklist.

The Bank Switch Kit has specific tips and forms for making sure your account is ready to close. First, you’ll have to make sure you have no automatic deposits or withdrawals. That might involve changing your direct deposit instructions at your job or changing your bill payment accounts. A standard form included in the Kit takes care of the first issue.

After ensuring you have no future deposits or withdrawals, you have to move your balance to zero. If your balance is less than zero, Wells Fargo will not let you close the account before paying what you owe. If you don’t pay what you owe, even if you don’t believe it’s your fault the account is negative, the account will go into collections and it will be more difficult for you to open a bank account anywhere else.

Most likely, your balance is above zero, and you have to clear the balance out before closing the account. With Wells Fargo, you can either transfer the balance to an external bank account linked to your Wells Fargo account. If you don’t have an external bank account linked to your Wells Fargo account, you can add the external account by logging into your account online, selecting “Transfers & Payments” from the menu, then selecting the “Transfers” page.

There are several links on this page to add your non-Wells Fargo account for transfers. It will take a few days to confirm that you own the external account.

If you already have a linked account you can use this page to transfer your full balance out of Wells Fargo into a different financial institution.

Another option for moving your balance to zero is to request an official bank check (a cashier’s check). You can do this in any Wells Fargo branch or you can request a check through the mail. Unfortunately, Wells Fargo charges a fee for cashier’s checks, whether you request them at a branch or through the mail. To request a check through the mail, send a notarized letter requesting the check and the closure of the accounts, and a confirmation of the address on the account, to the following address:

Wells Fargo
350 SW Jefferson Street DP5
Portland, Oregon, 97201

Once the above is complete — you will have no future automatic deposits or withdrawals and your balance is zero — you can officially close the account. If you do not do this step, you will continue to have an account at Wells Fargo with a zero balance. If that’s the case, you could run afoul of minimum balance requirements. You will be charged a monthly fee for your low balance, and your account will have a negative balance. You will owe the bank money.

Make sure you continue the process to close the account. You have three options for doing so.

Option #1: The internet. Log onto your Wells Fargo account online. Select “Contact Us,” a link at the top of every page on wellsfargo.com. On the right side of the Contact page, under “Other Ways to Contact Us,” select “Email Us.” You can choose the account you’d like to close, and choose “Account questions or requests” as the subject of your email.

Leave the next three fields blank (Transaction Date, Transaction Amount, and Account Number), and state in the Questions or Comments box that your account has a zero balance and you would like the bank to close it. Click the Submit button at the bottom of the form and wait for confirmation from Wells Fargo.

Option #2: The phone. Call the bank at 1-800-869-3557. You will be asked to enter your account number right away, and then you’ll be given the options. Choose to speak to a customer service representative to close your account over the phone.

Option #3: In person. Walk into any Wells Fargo branch and a manager can complete the process for you.

Thankfully, the process for closing a Wells Fargo bank account is easier than it is for other banks. Do you plan to close your Wells Fargo checking or savings account? If so, why? If you’ve already closed your account, were you pleased with the process?

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Should the US Postal Service Offer Basic Financial Services?

by Luke Landes
Post Office basic financial services

The U.S. Postal Service could offer basic banking services to customers, many of whom do not have reliable and affordable access to mainstream banking products like savings accounts and forms of credit. From the moment I heard this, it sounded like a bad idea. Not long ago, discussions about the U.S. Postal Service focused on ... Continue reading this article…

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MONEY’s Best Banks in America 2013

by Luke Landes
MONEY's Best Banks in America 2013

The MONEY magazine published its annual analysis of the best banks in America, and I count at least one surprise among the list of 15 categories. Just last month, personal finance bloggers voted on their favorite banks in the Fourth Annual Plutus Awards, and came up with a list with some notable differences, although the ... Continue reading this article…

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Money Systems That Lead to Success: Automatic Savings

by Luke Landes
Make Savings Automatic

Last month, I wrote about the opinions of Scott Adams on his eventual success as the creator of the comic strip Dilbert. I focused on the failure aspect of the article he wrote for the Wall Street Journal, and I only touched lightly on the success factors. A system, a methodical way of approaching any ... Continue reading this article…

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Received a Postcard From Bank of America But No Check?

by Luke Landes
Bank of America Class Action Lawsuits

If you’ve received a postcard from Bank of America informing you that you should expect to receive a check as part of the overdraft lawsuit, but you haven’t received a check, you may be wondering what you can do. Consumerism Commentary receives many questions about these checks because I’ve written about them and the lawsuit ... Continue reading this article…

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The Occupy Debit Card

by Luke Landes
Occupy Banks

Can an organization offer mainstream financial products while being ideologically opposed to the mainstream financial industry? That’s the question I began considering when I first heard that the Occupy Wall Street movement was in the process of developing a prepaid debit card product. The Occupy Debit Card is still just a concept, but if the ... Continue reading this article…

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GE Capital Bank Online Savings Account: I Was Declined

by Luke Landes
GE Capital Bank

This article started as a regular review of an online savings account. I’ve written many of these for Consumerism Commentary over the years, and I’ve always followed a similar process: I open a new account in my own name, naturally, I link the account to an existing account of mine, I transfer money into the ... Continue reading this article…

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PerkStreet’s Closing Signals Danger for Rewards Debit Cards

by Luke Landes
PerkStreet Closing

If you have been a customer of PerkStreet, you joined to take advantage of the company’s debit card rewards program, and had accrued rewards as of August 12, you just got screwed, to put it bluntly. PerkStreet is closing, the company canceled their rewards program, and the company will not be paying out any accumulated ... Continue reading this article…

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Capital One 360 Customer Service: Unsolved Issue With Customer’s Mortgage

by Luke Landes
Capital One 360

When Capital One purchased ING Direct and ultimately rebranded the bank as ” Capital One 360,” long-time customers of the online bank asked the same questions. Would Capital One continue ING Direct’s tradition of competitive rates and excellent customer service? Not everyone’s experience with ING Direct has been perfect, but overall, the bank was as ... Continue reading this article…

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Debit Card Swipe Fees Could Shrink, But Will Banks Punish Consumers?

by Luke Landes
Debit card swipe fees

It’s the lobby of retailers versus the lobby of retail banks. Retailers claimed a small victory recently when a U.S. District Court struck down a rule that capped debit card swipe fees at about $0.24 a transaction. The original cap proposed by the Federal Reserve was $0.12 but as the Federal Reserve operates more for ... Continue reading this article…

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Many Low-Income Families Can’t Use Mainstream Banking Even If They Wanted

by Luke Landes
Bank

I’ve written previously about many different reasons households, particularly those in locations where families typically have low incomes and those in areas where certain minorities constitute a majority of households, are more likely to take advantage of the high-cost alternative banking system including payday loans and check-cashing storefronts. For example, traditional banks find it difficult ... Continue reading this article…

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PNC Offers Videos and Interaction With Financial Advice

by Luke Landes
PNC Achievement Sessions

Last week, I criticized the McDonald’s corporation for producing a website and a toolkit, aimed at their employees, designed to help those employees tackle the financial obstacles they are most likely to face. My first point was that financial literacy education hasn’t been proven to help the most needy, and in some studies, has been ... Continue reading this article…

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Capital One 360 Independence Day Sale

by Luke Landes
Capital One 360 Account Overview

Capital One 360, the online bank formerly known as ING Direct, is offering special deals for new customers. I’m a long-time customer, and I opened my account when ING Direct was offering one of the best interest rates available among online savings accounts. The interest rate, like all interest rates, has shrunk over the course ... Continue reading this article…

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Prepaid Debit Cards Are Riskier Than Checking Accounts

by Luke Landes

Thanks to heavy marketing campaigns, including endorsements and partnerships with everyone from Russell Simmons to Kim Kardashian to Suze Orman (it’s hip! it’s popular! it’s financially smart!), use of prepaid debit cards has surged. Prepaid debit cards were once a fringe financial product. They were intended to be used by people who have a communal ... Continue reading this article…

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Damage Control: Taking an Unwarranted Vacation (From My Finances)

by Luke Landes
San Francisco

This week should have been a vacation. It has been, for the most part, but not entirely. While I’ve traveled occasionally over the past few years, and even chosen destinations meant for relaxation and time alone with loved ones, I haven’t had one of those fabled true vacations. My cell phone was still near by. ... Continue reading this article…

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Barclays Online Savings Review

by Luke Landes
Barclay's Online Savings Account Review

Barclays has enjoyed a long and storied history as a financial industry leader in the United Kingdom. While those of us in the United States often consider a financial company to be historied once it passes its centennial, Barclays was founded in 1690. As an organization, the bank is older than our country. The brand ... Continue reading this article…

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Capital One 360 Savings Account Review

by Luke Landes
Capital One 360 Logo

Capital One’s decision to acquire ING Direct was a great strategic move, but the deal had a few problems. Because ING Direct’s parent company, as part of a European bail-out agreement, was required to sell ING Direct in the United States and in other global locations, and to cease using the ING Direct name, Capital ... Continue reading this article…

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