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Personal Development

We all have those times when it feels like there aren’t enough hours in the day. Between juggling work responsibilities, being there for the family, and maintaining relationships with friends, life stretches us thin. Spending time on personal and professional development can feel like a luxury that we simply cannot afford.

But in reality, most of us know that some luxuries can be worth the cost. Time spent in support of our personal and professional growth is not wasted, but rather an investment. Doing something you love is good for your emotional well-being. Plus, having a breadth of skills and interests can open professional doors, too.

The good news is that you can drive your personal and professional development, no matter how crunched for time you may be. Here are a few ideas to get you started:

Whatever you’re doing, commit to it.

You’re the person that cares the most about your own development and growth. So, if you really want it to happen, you must be committed. No one else is going to do it for you.

It’s easy to spend your time worrying about failing to develop, instead of using that time to invest in getting started. Take a small step today and see how you feel.

Hack it:

  • Make a small goal to start off and build momentum, or it’ll quickly become overwhelming.
  • Use a habit-tracking app like coach.me to help you manage your daily goals. By checking in daily and using reminders, it’s easy to stay on course.
  • Use a public commitment app where you create a commitment contract — and put your own cash on the line if you quit. Try Stikk, the app which lets you create a commitment journal and share your progress with friends.

Prioritize and plan

Some development activities are just for fun. Others will be more professionally focused, and might even be a prerequisite for your job. To stay motivated, you need to understand what you’re getting from each experience.

If professional development is your goal, talk to your boss and others in your field for ideas of the activities and qualifications that really count in your industry. Prioritize these for greatest effect.

Hack it:

  • Balance personal and professional projects to keep it interesting.
  • Some activities, such as volunteering in a related field to your current work, can offer both professional and personal development
  • Keep records as you go of the development activities you have undertaken. These are a great personal diary, but also help you to keep your resume updated over time.

Use tech

These days, professional and personal development is often accessed at the touch of a button. Information is everywhere, and easier than ever to tap into.

Even if you only have a few minutes, you can read an article or a book online to access the latest ideas in your field. If you’re thinking of taking up a new hobby for fun, you will find a community of like minded people online. You can also discover ideas and support to get you started.

Hack it:

  • Do you see things you would like to read but never seem to have time? Create a reading list for later, using an app like Pocket or Safari’s Bookmarking tool. Then hit it up when you’re on public transport or have five minutes to kill waiting in line.
  • Look at book summary sites to get a feel for which books might be interesting to you. Or sign up to Blinkist for canned versions of non fiction books you can get through in 2-15 minutes. Their curated lists (like ‘Essential reading for job seekers’) are especially good.
  • Podcasts and audiobooks are a perfect way to access information if you don’t have time to read, but spend time driving or walking places. Services like Audible make downloading and accessing easy, and often offer free books.
  • By following the right people (leaders in your industry, for example) on Twitter and other social media, you can get leads on what is new in your field.
  • Try Google alerts to get articles on topics relevant to you, direct to your inbox.

Hook up with others

There’s a reason that weight loss groups are popular. The psychology of working in a team towards a shared goal means that everyone progresses faster — and often, has more fun with it.

If you’re lucky enough to to have a mentor or coach, or a ‘ready made’ group to work with, then use them well. But even if you don’t, there are other ways to find groups of active people looking to develop.

Hack it:

  • Make a public commitment to develop a certain skill or achieve a certain thing. Tell your friends you’re working on your development, and ask for their support. Maybe they’ll join you in your journey.
  • Look up like-minded people. They’re out there! Find a group in your city using Meetup, or go online to hook up with others using social media, special interest forums, and blogging groups.
  • The coach.me community has active groups working on a wide range of goals. You can hire a coach for a small fee, or simply join the discussion forums. Here, you’ll get ideas and advice from others doing the same as you.

It doesn’t matter what you learn

It sounds counterintuitive, but what you learn is not half as important as the simple fact that you are pushing yourself to learn something new. Anything you undertake — even if not connected to your job — stretches you outside your comfort zone. You’ll develop crucial coping skills for work and home.

Hack it:

  • Got a friend who goes to life-drawing classes? Attends cooking school? Or maybe you know someone who is learning computer programming? Join them! Most adult learning environments are happy to let their students bring a friend along to try the class out, so you have nothing to lose.
  • Get online with a site like Khan Academy. You’ll get free access to learning materials on topics from economics to programming, chemistry to history.
  • Learning a language is a great way to improve your employability, and is something that can be done in bite size chunks. You progress when you have the time, and continue practicing what you’ve learned in the interim. Try a site like lingvist or babbel for example, to carry your classes in your pocket wherever you go.

Look after yourself

A final note from me: look after yourself as you seek out new personal and professional development opportunities. It is an adventure which can get pretty addictive.

Don’t try to do too much or you’ll end up stretched thin and unable to do anything well. Pace yourself, do what you enjoy, and find what brings the greatest personal and professional rewards. By starting small and finding ways to expand your horizons — without having to drastically alter your lifestyle — you’re investing your time wisely in your own future.

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Any person is a product of his or her environment to a significant extent. And because so much of our personality is formed when we are under the age of ten, there’s something to be said for the benefits of being a child within a family situation that has a positive approach to money management — and life beyond just money, but money is the focus of this article.

I benefited from parents who put a priority on education. As I progressed through high school, I was encouraged to explore my various passions, as well, even though that contributed to less of a focus on the educational system that was providing my grades. Nevertheless, I was lucky. I didn’t choose my parents. I didn’t choose to be born in a first-world country to an educated couple. My family wasn’t rich, but I was privileged by not being within an obvious minority. Religiously, I was and am a part of a minority, but because it wasn’t necessarily visible, I benefited from at least some privilege of the majority.

It’s impossible to know if and how my life would be different today if these variables, all of which are beyond my control, were different. Chances are, some things would be different.

I’ve written on Consumerism Commentary often about taking control of your finances. That is exactly what I needed to do at the turn of the millennium. I was in debt, ignoring things like speeding tickets because I couldn’t afford the fines, spending all of my money on commuting expenses and basic necessities for living. I considered myself a victim of circumstances. Yes, I was a victim, even though I knew I had many advantages in life that would never be afforded to a lot of other people throughout the world and even my country of the United States.

My boss at a non-profit organization tried to impart his wisdom about life, but I wasn’t interested in hearing it. To me, it was empty words from a CEO who refused to offer important benefits to his employees, someone who was able to let the company pay for his expenses without any concern for the struggling financial condition of those who worked for him. Being able to afford a reliable vehicle for transportation was something he didn’t have to worry about, and from that position, it’s easy to say that all aspects of your life are a direct result of your choices.

This is a refrain common among motivational speakers. If there’s something about your life that you want to change, it is within your control to do so. And I eventually learned to accept most of this philosophy when pertaining to money management and financial independence. I still challenge any motivational speaker to go to country run by terrorists and say, “It’s easy. Just leave. Start a business. You’ll become rich.” It’s an extreme example, but there are people out there who really do believe any challenge can be overcome with a little hard work.

For most of us, that’s true. If you’re able to read this article, it’s probably true for you. But there are millions of people in the world who don’t have the luck to be born under your circumstances. Some of those millions of people will eventually escape their oppressive regimes, but the vast majority won’t, and it won’t be due to a lack of effort.

I’ve been very fortunately in my life, particularly these last few years if you look at life from a financial angle. The entrepreneur in me wants credit for that. In fact, the marketer in me finds it very important for me to advertise the fact that I’ve built an unexpected business out of nothing and reached financial independence at the age of 35. For many people, this is a dream come true. Anyone can have an idea, work hard for a decade, more or less, and change his or her life in an amazing way. This is the motivational story that people want to hear. Some who hear it will go on and do great things. Others will not be effected, and even if a motivational story changes one person’s life, doesn’t that make it worthwhile?

The human in me takes a different approach. The success story is such a powerful motivator that sometimes it drowns out the reality. The marketer doesn’t want to admit that factors other than perseverance played a role in success. The entrepreneur doesn’t want to believe that other people were involved in making the impossible possible. If you start to accept that there is more to your success than you, it makes it more difficult to sell books and products or to book yourself on national television.

We want life’s stories to be perfect and simple. We want them to be understood, from start to finish, within a 42-minute hour. A success story isn’t simple, though. Had I faced social obstacles like racism, I may have had a different outlook on life that led me in a different direction. If I had been born in 1776 instead of 1976, I might have died from bronchitis as a child. Had I been born in the Middle East instead of Brooklyn, I might have died in war. It would have been very unlikely for me to come out of a family without an education with a love for learning, a desire to live up to high expectations, and the tools necessary to succeed.

An entrepreneur will never credit “luck” when asked for the reason for one’s success (though many certainly will blame “bad luck” when they fail). To admit that circumstances, or anything beyond personal choices and effort, played a major role in success makes all the hard work seem less valuable. I know that I wouldn’t be where I am today without the advantages I was born with and the smart people I’ve surrounded myself with. Yes, I worked at my passion of building online communities since I was a teenager. That helped me prepare myself for the perfect storm that arrived with my business, where my passions coincided with a huge public interest and a large marketable field.

If I hadn’t done the work, I would have been behind, trying to catch up, if I had tried at all. But if the circumstances of my life that led to that instance were different, if I had been discouraged from using the internet, from spending my time learning programming languages, or from rewriting and writing code that allowed people to communicate online, I might not have followed my passions. If my parents encouraged me to worry more about my future earning potential than my hobbies, my life would have been much more boring and probably much less successful.

I can’t forget about all of these aspects of life just to sell a story about hard work and success. I can’t ignore my human side and neglect gratitude for others around me.

If you find yourself blaming your financial problems on aspects of your life that you can’t control while attributing your success to hard work, you might be able to motivate people to succeed. But you’d be missing, or perhaps willfully ignoring, the full picture. Your choices and your circumstances both help to form who you are today. The more you ask yourself, “Why?” the more you’ll be able to truly understand your circumstances today and a possible path for improvement.

No one sees success in the world without external influence. At the same time, all the hard work in the world can’t save everybody from the bad circumstances into which they were born. There are exceptions to every rule, but they are few and far between, and despite the use of exceptions as motivational tools, they’re not likely to help the majority of people.

Take a moment and thing about your failures and your successes. Who do you blame for your failures? Is it always someone other than yourself? If so, take some time and think about the choices you’ve made that may have led you to that result.

Who do you credit for your successes? If you only see the hard work you’ve done, take some time to think about whether your situation would have been possible had you lived in another time or another part of the world. Think about the obstacles you’d need to overcome.

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As one year comes to a close, many people like to take a few moments and think about the year ahead. The setting of New Year’s resolutions is a time-honored tradition and a recurring theme at the end of each year. The new year has always been a chance, although somewhat arbitrary, to give yourself a fresh start. It’s a second chance. It’s an opportunity to recommit yourself to the things that are important to you.

Discussions of New Year’s resolutions are almost always followed by statistics showing how people generally fail at keeping the promises they make. News reporters and authors cite the spike in new gym memberships after the new year and the quick fall-off of gym participation as one example of how people with good intentions don’t stick to their plans. Studies show how financial New Year’s resolutions fail.

The backlash against the process of setting New Year’s resolutions is taken over by management experts who say the problem is that resolutions do not take the form of goals. If people stated their resolutions in a format enjoyed by corporate project management gurus, the SMART goal system for instance, people would have a better chance of sticking to their resolutions.

SMART is an acronym that most Consumerism Commentary readers are familiar with. These SMART goals are specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and time-based. It’s not a bad system for evaluating employee performance, and the SMART concept can be extended into other areas of your life, like planning the activities you want to undertake in the new year.

Guess what? Whether you define your plans for the new year as broad resolutions or specific SMART goals, you’re just as likely to fail. People don’t want to stick to specific goals in the personal lives when they already have pressure from work-related goals, assigned by their employers, their clients, or themselves as business owners. The probability of people making charts to track progress on personal goals and sticking with it for more than a month is the same as the probability of sticking with a resolution.

SMART goals might make you feel better about your plans if you like treating your life as a business, but in the end it’s no more effective than setting resolutions. You can’t take someone who wasn’t going to keep his resolution, teach him about SMART goals, and expect that he will turn into a productive individual in his personal life. Now, treating your life as a business can be a good idea — after all, you are not only the Chief Financial Officer of your own life, you’re also the CEO. And if you are in the habit of looking at your life from that approach, you’re all ready more likely to keep your promises to yourself, whether they be resolutions or SMART goals.

Because of this backlash against New Year’s resolutions, people have yet another reason for not keeping their promises. When it’s a widely accepted fact that people do not, in general, maintain their resolutions more than a month or so into the new year, people don’t feel much pressure to continue. Well, the internal monologue goes, people don’t really keep these resolutions, so it’s no big deal if I don’t keep them either. The culture of mediocrity makes it easier for people to give up.

Setting New Year’s resolutions are beneficial, even if you don’t keep them. That’s because reflection and self-analysis are important pieces of living your life. If you take the time to make resolutions beyond “losing weight” and “saving money,” you’re asking yourself questions that get to the core of your identity. Having a good understanding of where you are and where you’d like to be provides more direction for your life.

The New Year is a time for renewal. It’s arbitrary, but so what? January 1 is as good a date as any to examine yourself and rededicate yourself not just to your goals, but to who you want to be as a person. This starts with a mission statement.

1. Define your personal mission statement.

Non-profit organizations have mission statements that define the purpose for which they exist. For example, this is the mission statement for the Boys & Girls Clubs of America:

… [t]o enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, responsible citizens.

Some organizations have mission statements that fit within one sentence, like the Boys & Girls Clubs of America. Some are several paragraphs long and go into great detail. I created a mission statement for Consumerism Commentary, even though it’s not a non-profit organization, because I feel every organization should have a mission. The mission of Consumerism Commentary is to develop financially literate, capable, and successful human beings by sharing educational, entertaining, and engaging writing. (I also developed a separate vision statement and purposes, including a hidden purpose for the website and business, which you can find out about here.)

A mission statement gets to the core of your identity and your values. Your mission statement could cover an area of interest you’re passionate about, it could pertain mainly to your role within your family, or it can even be based on values from your religion. I’ll write more about my personal mission statement in an upcoming article.

Once you have a mission statement, you can evaluate your goals and activities based on how closely they relate to your mission. When a non-profit I worked for received a project proposal, if it didn’t fit into the organization’s mission, management would not consider the proposal. At the same time, a mission statement is a living document, which means it can be reevaluated, updated, and changed over time, to fit changing demands of the world, the organization, or life.

2. Evaluate the last twelve months.

There have most likely been a few moments of pride in the course of the last year. You probably also had some disappointments in your life. The key is determining which aspects of your life in the past year were within your control and which were outside of your control. When you begin to look closely, you may see that more things are within your control than you might first believe.

How much time and effort you spend evaluating the past and present is up to you. You can’t dwell on mistakes you made in the past, but you can try to learn from them, and help your past determine the best strategies for improving your future. The bottom line is to determine whether you are closer to your mission today than you were a year ago. Your mission is an ideal, a wish that can never be completely fulfilled. It’s a non-SMART goal. It provides the path so you are always moving in the right direction — a journey, not a destination.

3. Where do you want to be twelve months from now?

With your present in mind, you can set your targets for the next year. This is where your mission and resolutions come into existence. Your mission helps you determine your resolutions — any resolution you pick must be somehow related to your mission. Whether you want to set SMART goals or operate at a higher level is up to you; the process of consciously contemplating these issues and making informed decisions is what will set you apart from people who blindly decide to “lose weight” and “save money” in the new year.

You may not end up exactly where you want to be twelve months from now, but if you live your life with a purpose and you strive to make informed decisions and best choices, you’ll move in the right direction.

4. Quantify yourself.

We’ve become obsessed with quantification in a number of areas of our lives, and it may have started in personal finance. We have software like Quicken to thank for that. Now it’s even easier, with mobile applications that provide us a way of tracking personal data on a minute by minute basis. Thanks to mobile apps, we know at any time how much money we’ve saved. We know how our investments are performing with real-time stock quotes. We know how many steps we’ve taken each day. We check our heart rate after each time we exercise. We know how many miles we’ve run over the past month. We know how much weight we’ve lifted and track when we beat our own personal records.

It’s easy to get lost in all these numbers, and there are privacy concerns about sharing these numbers with applications who may use the information to profit. But if there’s something numerical that can be tracked, there’s a good chance there’s an application that will allow us to do just that. And where there was a time that we’d have to track results manually and build our own charts, now that this is mostly automated, we can get the benefit of data visualization much easier.

Data visualization, in turn, provides great feedback when it comes to progressing towards measurable goals. That’s one of the primary purposes of Naked With Cash here at Consumerism Commentary. If you are interested in the typical New Year’s resolutions of saving money and losing weight, don’t just wish broadly, don’t just make SMART goals, but use these tools to motivate you.

5. Get an accountability partner.

Self-motivation is difficult, and there’s no reason to torture yourself for not sticking to your goals. The solution to waning intrinsic motivation is to team up. For years, I was looking for someone to be my accountability partner in terms of my health and fitness. I kept hoping my girlfriend would be interested in taking this journey with me, but despite my efforts, we did not share this interest. I joined a gym, and for some time, the monthly payments motivated me to seriously begin moving forward. That lasted about six months before I lost my motivation.

It wasn’t until I hired a personal trainer that things started to move in the right direction. My trainer is an accountability partner. I have regularly scheduled appointments that I know I can’t miss. I know I’m moving in a much better direction now.

Your spouse can be your accountability partner if they are just as passionate about your mission as you are. But if not, or if you don’t have a spouse, you may need to look to someone else. With a friend, mutual motivation is a strong bonding agent; but if you don’t have someone to support and motivate you, hiring a professional is not a bad idea if you can afford it.

It doesn’t matter whether you choose to make high-level resolutions or SMART goals when the new year comes around. The process of self-examination is what’s important. The reminder of your mission and your motivation to stay on a positive path is what brings you success year after year. Most people forget their resolutions and SMART goals after a month or two, but if you get in the habit of evaluating your choices and your progress, it doesn’t matter whether you reach your goal of losing 50 pounds or paying off $50,000 in debt by June. Continuous analysis guarantees you’ll be moving in the right direction, aligned with your values and your mission.

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Consumerism Commentary and the articles I write here have changed since I started writing about personal finance in 2003. I’ve personally gone through four financial phases over the thirteen years or so, and because I draw much of my writing from personal experiences, any readers who have been around over the past decade might have noticed the changes and how they’ve affected my perspective.

Phase 1. Financial ignorance. It was easier for me to close my eyes to the financial trouble I was getting myself into. I’m still pleased that I pursued a living I was passionate about through and after college without regard to possibility of an insecure financial future, but there came a point where I needed to change my declining situation.

Phase 2. Personal and financial stability and growth. I began learning about managing my money, spending less than I was earning, and growing my wealth. In this phase, I began a personal blog, Consumerism Commentary, to document my progress, keep myself accountable, and expand my knowledge. In a new job and a new living situation, I was able to save money from every pay check. Before long, I was on my way to getting out of debt and building a solid emergency fund. I started saving for retirement for the first time.

Phase 3. Approaching financial independence. In Phase 2, I was concerned about my ability to negotiate a decent raise every year. There’s nothing more annoying than having to put up with the corporate environment where you constantly need to fight for getting the bonus you deserve.

I was starting to build my own business in Phase 3, and when I had more control over my own destiny, the pettiness of corporate life stopped mattering as much. By the time I quit my day job, I had financial independence in my sights.

Phase 4. Achieving financial independence. The point at which finances are no longer a constraint brings its own problems. The need for financial stability can instill a drive for success, and financial independence eliminates that type of desperation. My financial needs have never been great in the first place, but now I struggle with taking some of my other passion projects to the next step.

Framing one’s life phases by changes in one’s relationship with money is only one way to look at life. It’s worthwhile to look at something more core to humanity’s existence than something as material as money. I’ve always said that net worth is not a real goal, that money is only valuable in terms of what it can do for you ability to live how you want. If your only goal is to retire at age 60 with $3 million — or to retire at age 35 with $10 million — you’re missing the point of financial independence. Until you can answer the question, “Why?” you have to give your life more thought.

This is a publication where the focus is on money. It makes sense for me to write articles that frame life in financial terms. But it’s good to go occasionally beyond the confines of money and look at life in a broader context. One philosophical theory I hear often is that life is not about the pursuit of money, it’s about the pursuit of happiness. Humans want to increase their wealth because financial independence removes barriers to living life in a way that evokes happiness.

Scientists have studied money and happiness to look for correlation and to determine if one has any effect on the other. This article from Forbes gives a summary of many of the major studies pertaining to money and happiness; there doesn’t seem to be much agreement. Not mentioned in the article is the famous study — at least among financial experts — that happiness is correlated to your financial standing among peers when measured by income. That is, you’re happier if you earn $50,000 while your cohorts earn $30,000 than you would be if you earned $100,000 while your friends and colleagues earn $150,000.

I have no reason to doubt the study. For most people, external factors influence happiness. Those external factors can be one’s standing among peers financial and otherwise, one’s freedom to make decisions in a job, and one’s family life that fits a personal definition of a family. Happiness can take form as just a lack of frustration or disappointment.

In those cases, happiness is an internal satisfaction influenced by external factors. But what most people who where included in this study may not know is that happiness is a choice. You can choose to be happy, choose how you react to any situation, but if you don’t choose to be happy, you’re choosing to be something other than happy. And you can choose to be happy regardless of external factors.

Choosing to be happy is not the same as choosing to be satisfied with your life to the point of not looking for improvement or change. If you look at happiness as an ultimate goal, you might think that you can’t be happy until your life is exactly how you want it to be, or you might think that if you’re happy, you would have no need to allow your life to change or no need to direct your life towards improvement. But because happiness is simply a choice you make on an ongoing basis, it cannot be an ultimate goal.

Unfortunately, this idea of choosing happiness has been co-opted by pop psychologists, self-help gurus, empowerment philosophers, and feel-good motivational speakers. It results in silly tips like “Be the best YOU you can be” (here) and “Count your blessings” (here). Read this stuff if it helps, but underneath this kind of brainwashing is the simple truth that you don’t need to wait for happiness to arrive some time in the future when your life lives up to your expectations.

Choosing happiness isn’t always easy. If you’re living in a difficult situation — even worse, an abusive situation — I am not saying that you should automatically be able to be happy. There are certainly some limits to how happy you can feel in your life at any one moment, and I think the pop psychology approach to choosing happiness often forgets this reality. And choosing happiness doesn’t mean remaining ignorant of trouble ahead; during my first financial phase, financial ignorance, I chose happy by ignoring my problems. But deep down I knew I was in trouble, so I wasn’t very happy, anyway.

The point is to choose the best goals. Money isn’t a goal because it’s just a tool to let you achieve real goals that pertain to your life and the world around you at a deeper level. Happiness isn’t a goal because you control your level of happiness simply by choosing to change it.

If your long-term goal is to find happiness in your life, take a look around you and ask yourself why you aren’t happy now. Take happiness out of the goal equation and determine the specific things you’d like to do or experience and make them your goals. Then, as you progress towards those goals, you can be happy because you know you’re on the right path — or at least on a path.

Read the obituary for the psychiatrist who introduced “choice theory” to a greater audience, William Glasser.

Photo: Flickr/rkramer62

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5 Keys to Full-Time Employment for Young People

by Luke Landes

The latest economic news from the Department of Labor paints a mediocre picture at best of the employment situation in the United States. It’s still difficult for young people to find full-time jobs. There may be some concern that this lower level of employment is going to be the new norm, and whether American society […]

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Privilege and Luck Drive Success: Toxic Financial Attitudes

by Luke Landes
Sheep

Let’s forget that most motivational stories are designed to get readers to purchase something or otherwise spend money. Gurus who consider themselves motivational speakers know this well. In a room full or listeners or an internet full of readers, a story with a positive message followed by a “call for action” is an effective sales […]

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Nothing Bad Is My Fault: Toxic Financial Attitudes

by Luke Landes
Danger

The difference between financial independence and a life of financial frustration comes down to attitude. The way you approach all aspects of your life, not just money, has a significant effect on your long-term financial growth. Personal philosophies dictate how you act and how you react to any situation you face. It’s worth the time […]

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Rescheduling My Life: Using Google Calendar for Better Time Management

by Luke Landes
Luke's Daily Calendar

Time management has never been my strength. Part of my approach to time management is rooted in my disdain for over-organization. I don’t want to treat my time as if I were on an assembly line. For most of my life, however, I was somewhat bound by daily schedules, just like most people. In school, […]

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You Can’t Take It With You

by Luke Landes
Beach

According to a recent study by the National Bureau for Economic Research, 46.1 percent of retirees die with a net worth of less than $10,000. There are two ways to achieve this outcome. The first is for those with a comfortable level of wealth in retirement. Wealth does an individual no good after he or […]

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Motivation for Multiple Streams of Income

by Evan
Television remote control

This is a guest article by Evan, creator of My Journey to Millions. In the article, Evan discusses what motivated him to move forward with earning multiple streams of income along this journey, and takes a motivational approach to inspire readers to improve their personal finances. Take a moment and just think about what you […]

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