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ING Direct Offers New Feature

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ING Direct is now requiring a new method to entering your secure PIN when logging in to view your account, involving a series of keystrokes that will be different each time you log in. This seems to be a method to thwart keylogging software. Here’s the notice:

ING DIRECT is always working to provide you with the highest level of protection against internet and computer security threats, so we’re happy to tell you that we’ve enhanced our login page to increase the security of your sensitive account information. We’re calling this new feature “PIN Guard”.

PIN Guard will appear on the login page of ingdirect.com and will enable you to either use your mouse to enter your PIN by clicking on numeric buttons on your screen, or allow you to type in letters that correspond to your PIN digits using your keyboard. Please be assured, this new login feature will not change your current PIN, nor will it require you to request a new one.

Here’s an example:

If your PIN is 1234, you would:

1. Use your mouse to click on the number 1 button on the PIN Guard keypad. Then, click on the number 2 button, etc., until you have entered your entire PIN. As you click on the buttons, asterisks will appear in the PIN input box to confirm each click. If necessary, you can click on the ‘clear’ button to start over. Then, simply click GO to login.

OR

2. Place the cursor in the PIN input box (the box where asterisks appear) by using your mouse or the tab key, and then use your keyboard to type the letters that correspond to 1234 on the PIN Guard keypad. In this case, it’s CWJX (“cwjx” also works since upper and lower case letters are treated the same). Then, simply click GO to login.

Note: the letters located on the PIN Guard keypad will be different each time you visit the login page.

Security is very important to us and we’re proud to provide you with an industry leading login feature that helps you protect your sensitive account information.

Published or updated September 13, 2005. If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the RSS feed or receive daily emails. Follow @ConsumerismComm on Twitter and visit our Facebook page for more updates.

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About the author

Luke Landes, also known as Flexo, is the founder of Consumerism Commentary. He has been blogging and writing for the internet since 1995 and has been building online communities since 1991. Find out more about him and follow Luke Landes on Twitter. View all articles by .

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