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Paid Off a Chunk of Debt This Week

This article was written by in Debt Reduction. 11 comments.


With the savings rates falling like bricks lately, there is no advantage to me keeping my student loan payments low while keeping my bank account in the stratosphere. My student loan interest rate is 4.25% and I may not qualify for any tax advantages which would otherwise effectively reduce that interest rate. My savings aren’t earning much more in interest, and after income tax, it’s likely less.

I’ve decided to speed up my student loan payments. I’ll end up with less cash on hand in the next few years, at the same time I might be purchasing a house, but the lack of debt will put me in a better position to afford a mortgage.

This week, I sent $5,000 to my student loan.

Updated June 21, 2011 and originally published October 5, 2007. If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the RSS feed or receive daily emails. Follow @ConsumerismComm on Twitter and visit our Facebook page for more updates.

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About the author

Luke Landes, also known as Flexo, is the founder of Consumerism Commentary. He has been blogging and writing for the internet since 1995 and has been building online communities since 1991. Find out more about him and follow Luke Landes on Twitter. View all articles by .

{ 11 comments… read them below or add one }

avatar FrugalTrader

Hey Flexo, yea it doesn’t make sense to keep a whole bunch of cash in your savings account when you have non-ded debt on hand. Considering that the interest earned on your savings is taxed as income, and paying down your loan is like an after tax return.

For example, if your savings account paid you 5.5% @ 40% marginal tax rate, your after tax return is: 3.3%. If you pay down your student loan, your after tax return is 4.25%.

FT

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avatar askprofit

Better to pay off debt..it will be worth it in the long run. Good for you!

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avatar paidtwice

Congrats on paying off a chunk of debt! That sounds awesome :)

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avatar The Dividend Guy

That is always a pretty good feeling to do that – it is more psychological than anything. Just don’t celebrate by buying a new TV with debt :-)

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avatar Luke Landes ♦127,365 (Platinum)

DividendGuy: Heh. No, I already bought my new TV (but not with debt).

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avatar Clever Dude

Congrats on getting rid of that debt. The student loans were next on my list before buying my wife a Mini. But we’ll have that paid off before January and then get back to the student loan payoff.

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avatar Patrick

Awesome! Congrats on the big payment. I think a lot more people will start doing something similar in the near future.

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avatar Colin

That is awesome! I did the same thing this week thanks to the dropping interest rates. I managed to take out around $13,000 of my student loan. Not too much longer….

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avatar Mrs. Micah

Congrats! That must have taken a big bite out of your debt. :-) It also sounds wise, considering the situation.

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avatar thomas

luckily my loans are below 3%. I’m really in no hurry to pay them off. My wife’s on the other hand is a totally different story. She’s stuck w/ a variable rate and it’s super high right now. I’m actually trying to dump the amount onto a fixed rate credit card b/c of the difference in payment. The tax benefit of her loans isn’t worth it.

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avatar Luke Landes ♦127,365 (Platinum)

Thanks for the words of encouragement, everyone!

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