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Personal Balance Sheet, February 2007 ($77,994, +3.66%)

This article was written by in Monthly Update. 20 comments.


February wasn’t as nice to me as January was, particularly thanks to the stock market issues in the last days of the month. So while overall I’m only up 3.66% in the last month, my non-invested accounts are up 7.23%.

Here are some notes. I’m now including a line for my company stock purchase plan to separate it from my brokerage investments. The amount in the plan currently has not been invested yet. It will remain cash until March 31, at which point I’ll be able to purchase stock at 15% below the lesser of the January 1 or March 31 price of the company stock. I plan on selling this stock at the first point I can, but I have to wait for an open trading window.

Take a look at the numbers before I get to the rest of the notes.

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As always, the credit card account is simply an “current accounts payable” account. That balance will be paid in full towards the end of the month, by which time I will have accrued more regular expenses on the card. I like this credit card because every once in a while they send a rebate check. I happened to receive one this month, and I’ll share the details in my income and expense report, which will be posted shortly.

As time passes, I am still slowly paying off my debt. My car loan at 2% should be completely paid off in September. The student loan will take some more time. I could pay a good portion of it off immediately, but I want to keep my cash around as I am looking into buying a condominium later this year.

I’ll get around to writing about my income and expenses after I have dinner.

Published or updated March 1, 2007. If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the RSS feed or receive daily emails. Follow @ConsumerismComm on Twitter and visit our Facebook page for more updates.

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About the author

Luke Landes, also known as Flexo, is the founder of Consumerism Commentary. He has been blogging and writing for the internet since 1995 and has been building online communities since 1991. Find out more about him and follow Luke Landes on Twitter. View all articles by .

{ 7 comments… read them below or add one }

avatar Sun

It’s great that your investments didn’t suffer a lot (still positive gain) from recent market down turn. Just curious, are those gains from contribution or from appreciation? We managed to stay positive for February only because we made some big contributions. Otherwise…

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avatar Luke Landes ♦127,386 (Platinum)

Sun: The positive gain in the investments is due to my contributions. On performance alone, my investments were mostly down for the month. Breaking it down, I had $1,321 in deposits and a loss of $278 in market value.

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avatar mnc

Likewise, I stayed positive for February due to my contributions as I took a hit there at the end of the month like most everyone else.

Being relatively new to your site, I thought I would ask if you have ever made these spreadsheets available for download? This looks like a great spreadsheet.

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avatar Luke Landes ♦127,386 (Platinum)

mnc: Welcome! Here are the spreadsheets I use (though my data is imported from Quicken): balance sheet and income/expense report.

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avatar mnc

Flexo, thanks for pointing me to those two posts with the links for the spreadsheets.

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avatar Sun

That explains. I guess it’s quite common for many people that any positive result is likely due to contributions. If the big hit came early in the month, we probably still had time to recover, but not on the last day of the month. Your loss was moderate though.

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avatar Golbguru

Even with a $278 loss in market value you are in a pretty good shape. Plus, 3.66% growth over a *bad* month is pretty good compared to what I have heard from some other people. So congratulations on that.

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