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Kevin Mercadante

Using rent payments to improve your credit is now easier than ever. We cover the websites that can help you report your rent to credit bureaus.

Rent Payments to Improve Your Credit

If you’re among the 36.6% of US households that rent, you’re probably missing out on the single biggest credit reference: Your rent payment!

Traditionally, the only way that your rent payments affect your credit score is if unpaid rent goes into collection. Your many years of making rent payments on time aren’t even recognized. Fortunately, that situation is changing. You may be able to help your own cause by learning how to report rent payments to credit bureaus.

Here are several services that can help you do just that.

Experian RentBureau

Experian has been moving forward in reporting rent histories through its Experian RentBureau. The service started in December, 2010, when Experian became the first credit reporting agency to include on-time rent payment data on its credit reports.

RentBureau will show your rental arrangement as a trade line, and includes your payments for the past 25 months. The data in the trade line will also show the date you started renting and your monthly payment amount.

There’s some really good news here, too. Experian will only include positive rental history. The reason is that negative rental information will usually show up as a collection account, which is already reported by the collection agencies.

Of course, there is a bit of a catch in the way this works. Your landlord won’t likely automatically report your rental history. That may be true even if you live in a very large apartment complex.

If you rent and you want your rent history included in your credit report, you’ll have to ask your landlord or property manager if they report to Experian RentBureau. If they do, you’re all set. But if they don’t, you’ll have to encourage them to do so. They may not want to. But there’s a workaround on how to report rent payments to credit bureaus.

How to Report Rent Payments to Credit Bureaus

To do that, you’ll have to have the landlord or property manager contact Experian RentBureau to set up the reference. Since there are fees (and extra work) involved, your landlord may have little interest in participating. If that’s the case, you can sign up for a rental payment service that works with Experian RentBureau.

When you do, you’ll actually make your rent payments through the rental payment service. The service will forward the rent to your landlord and then report the payment to Experian.

The downside to using a rental payment service is that you will usually have to pay a fee. Some services have a setup fee that could be as high as $50. But almost all have a per-payment fee as well. That fee can be a few dollars for each check payment or a percentage of either a debit card or credit card payment.

For example, if a service charges a 2.75% fee for a credit card payment and your rent is $1,000 per month, you will pay $27.50 per payment.

That’s obviously a bit steep. But if you’re looking to build a credit rating, it could be an expense worth paying.

Rental payment service providers that cooperate with Experian RentBureau include:

  • PayLease – Must sign up to determine fees.
  • PayYourRent – ACH fee (undisclosed) or 2.75% credit card fee.
  • RENTTRACK – ACH $6.95, debit card 2.75%, credit card 2.95%. ***Also reports to Equifax and TransUnion.***
  • ClearNow – Fees paid by landlord who might charge them back to you.
  • eRentPayment – ACH/eCheck $3 per transaction. ***Also reports to Equifax and TransUnion.***
  • rentler – $1.95 for bank transactions, 1.9% for debit cards, 2.9% for credit cards.

With services where the fee is paid by the landlord, it’s almost certain that the landlord will pass those fees on to you.

Rental Kharma

Rental Kharma is a service that reports your rent payment history to TransUnion. They do this after verifying your lease and your monthly payments with your landlord. After that, each payment that you make will be verified. You could also add your last 24 months of rent payments to fast-forward the process of building your credit score.

Rental Kharma isn’t a rental payment service. Instead, they contact your landlord once you’ve made your payment and verify that you made it on time. That means that though you will subscribe to the service for credit purposes, you will still make your rent payment directly to your landlord.

Rental Kharma also has what could be a big advantage for certain tenants. Rent payments are only considered late if they are more than 30 days past the due date. So if your rent is due on November 1, it will not be reported late to the credit bureau as long as it’s paid by November 30. But they do recommend that if you sometimes go beyond 30 days, you may not want to subscribe to the service. That is, rent payments more than 30 days late will count against you.

In order to join the service, you have to pay a one-time validation fee of $25. After that, you pay a monthly subscription fee of $6.95 for ongoing reporting. If you want to add your previous rent history, the fee is $5 for each month verified, up to a maximum of 24 months.

Your landlord must be willing to participate in the service, since they will need to verify your rent payments. But Rental Kharma is an easier sell to a landlord because the landlord isn’t required to pay any fees.

TransUnion RentReporters

You can also get TransUnion involved directly in rent reporting through their RentReporters service. Like Rental Kharma, they verify your rent payments with your landlord and then include the history on your TransUnion credit report.

Their website advertises that “The average credit score can increase 35 to 50 points in 15 days” as a result of adding your rent history to your credit report.

RentReporters has a one-time enrollment fee of $45.95. That fee includes both the landlord verification process and reporting up to two years of previous rental payments. To continue reporting future payments, there is a monthly subscription fee of $9.95.

If you have had different landlords in the past two years, RentReporters can verify your rent payment history for an additional fee of $50 for each landlord.

So that’s how to report rent payments to credit bureaus. All you need is a few extra dollars and a willing landlord, and you can have your rent payment history added to your credit report. If that history has been a good one, you could see an almost immediate increase in your credit score.

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Trading in your car at the dealer is guaranteed to lose you money. Yet many opt for this route because it’s easy. The better approach, however, is to sell your car yourself. You’ll get more money, and it’s easier than many think. Here’s how to sell your car fast and for top dollar.

Sell Your Car

In this guide, we’ll walk through the benefits of selling your car on your own. Then we’ll give you some practical tips on how to do it.

Why You Should Always Try to Sell Your Car Yourself First

Trading your car into a dealer when you purchase a new vehicle is quick and easy. That’s why so many people opt for this approaching to disposing of their car. Unfortunately, the dealer won’t give you the best price.

It also complicates the negotiations. With a trade-in, your must negotiate both the price of your new car and the value of your old car. Car dealers are experts at this process. You and I are not. By removing the trade-in negotiations, you greatly simplify the process.

By selling your car yourself, you can maximize the cash that you will receive. As an example, we valued a 2016 Volvo XC90. Using Kelley Blue Book, we compared the money we’d receive from a private party sale versus a deal trade in. The difference was almost $3,000.

Get the Estimated Value of Your Car

Since most of us aren’t car experts, you should get this information from a trusted third-party source. You can get an estimate from a dealer, but they may give you a lowball number under the assumption that you be trading the car in. What you actually want is what you can likely sell your car for.

Fortunately, there are online sources where you can get this information. Two of the best sources are Kelly Blue Book (which we used above) and Edmunds.com. You should also check used car buying sites such as AutoTrader and Craigslist.

In order to get the most accurate value of your vehicle on those sites, you need to be accurate in describing the details of the car. This will be particularly important in regard to the car’s overall condition since it can result in wide variations in value.

They will typically give you three values:

  • Trade-in
  • Dealer retail
  • Private party

Dealer retail will be the highest. It is unlikely, however, you will be able to get that price. You aren’t a dealer and don’t have a dealer’s marketing power. Trade-in will be the lowest, but it’s not what you’re going for. A private party sale will be the most relevant number, as it is the price that you will most likely get for your car on direct sale.

Once you have this number, you should price your vehicle accordingly. Too high and you may not even get anyone to look at the car. But price it too low, and you’ll be losing money.

Get the Loan Information if You Still Owe Money on Your Car

There are two important pieces of information that you will need if you have a loan on your car:

  1. The payoff balance on your loan, and
  2. How to get the title to your car in the shortest timeframe possible.

The payoff balance will let you know how much cash you can expect to clear on the sale. Alternatively, it may show that you are under water and might have to write a check in order to close out the loan after the sale. You need to know this information to decide if selling your car is even the right option.

The title information is just as important. If you have a loan on your car, then the title to the vehicle is in the possession of the lender. The sale of the vehicle has to happen first so that you will have the cash to pay off the loan. But in order to complete the sale of the car, you’ll have to be able to deliver the title to the new owner.There will be a delay in this

There will be a delay in this process after the sale is completed. But you want to get information from the lender so as to keep that timeframe as short as possible.

Find out what the payoff process is, and what the best way to retrieve the title will be. That will likely require getting specific names and addresses, to make sure that all correspondence goes to the right party. You’ll also have to check and see what type documentation the lender will require for the payoff, in addition to the payment itself.

Where to Advertise Your Vehicle for Sale

There are plenty of ways to sell your car online. This can include Craigslist and AutoTrader.com, but you could also try eBay and even Facebook. Also, do email blasts to everyone on your email list who lives in your local area. Even if a direct recipient has no interest, they may forward the email on to someone they know whose looking for a car.

But you don’t have to rely just on online sources. Some of the more traditional advertising methods can work as well. Create a flyer that includes important information about the car, as well as two or three color photos of the vehicle. Post them on the bulletin board at work, at your house of worship, and in any public places that will allow it.

Accepting Payment Proceeds from the Buyer of Your Car

Payment is a specific issue when selling your car yourself, so you will have to take several precautions.

Never accept a personal check. In a worst-case scenario, the buyer can make off with your car, and you’re stuck with a bad check – and the bank fees that you will be charged for it. In that situation, legal action will be your only resort. And that may not work if the personal check you accepted turns out to be fraudulent. It happens in the real world, and not infrequently.

At a minimum, insist that the buyer pay by either certified check or a bank check. Keep in mind that cashier’s checks can be forged. As Teresa Dixon from the Cleveland Plain Dealer recently noted,

It used to be that getting a cashier’s check was a sure-fire way to avoid fraud. Not anymore. The fraudulent cashier’s checks out there fool the banks sometimes. I’ve dealt with cases in the last few years where even PNC and Huntington tellers accepted cashier’s checks that later ended up no good. Sometimes even the police can’t tell.

Better yet, hold the closing of the sale at the buyer’s bank – the same one that the check is drawn on. That should enable you to verify that the funds are available in the buyer’s account.

If the buyer is using a loan to purchase your vehicle, hold the closing at the lending bank. That will enable you to get a bank employee involved in the process. If the new lender is not a local bank, hold the closing at your bank, and ask your bank to verify the authenticity of the check from the buyer’s lender.

None of this guarantees that you won’t get stiffed on the payment, but it does lower the chances considerably.

Selling Your Car Yourself – Keeping it Legal

There will be several steps on the legal side of the sale.

Bill of sale.You will need to prepare a bill of sale in order to complete the sales transaction. Google “automotive bill of sale” for your state in order to get an acceptable form, then complete it with all of the relevant information. The bill of sale will be important if there is an existing loan on your car, and you will not be able to produce the car title immediately.

Temporary operating permit. The buyer can use the bill of sale to obtain this permit from the state department of motor vehicles (DMV). This will allow the buyer to operate the vehicle until the title can be delivered. Receipt of the title can take anywhere from a few days to two or three weeks, so this is an important step for the buyer.

Release of liability. This is a document that is available on your state DMV website. It will confirm the sale of the vehicle. Don’t skip this step! Completing and filing this form with the DMV will release you of liability on the vehicle. File it immediately after the sale to avoid potential problems. The form will likely require the odometer reading at the time of sale. Contact your state DMV to get specific information about this form.

Pay required transfer fees. You can find out what these are from the DMV. This can include sales tax if your state charges it on auto sales. You will want to pay them immediately after the sale since that is when you will have the cash to do so. But in addition, the payment of fees will represent additional confirmation of the transfer of the vehicle, and therefore the release of your liability.

Don’t forget to remove the license plates! The license plates run with the owner, not with the car itself. As well, you could probably transfer the plates to your next vehicle. The buyer will have to work out the license plate situation immediately after the sale.

Though the process of selling your car yourself seems complicated, remember that it can result in your getting thousands more than what you will get by trading it into the dealer. In the end, it will almost certainly be worth the extra effort on your part.

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Do you ever have a sense that you have a bad 401(k) at work? If you do, you’re not alone. While a lot of employers have 401(k) plans, many of those plans are average or worse. But if you are in such a plan, you do have options.

Bad 401k at work

First we’ll look at how to evaluate a 401(k) plan. It’s much easier than you think. Then, if you find your retirement plan lacking, we’ll give you some actionable tips you can follow to make the most of a bad 401(k).

What Makes a 401(k) ‘Bad’

How do you know that you’re not just being a malcontent about your plan? Is it really bad? Here are some telltale signs:

  • High fees. High fees usually come in the form of high expense ratios. An expense ratio is the industry’s term to describe how much a mutual fund charges its shareholders. An expense ratio of 1.00% means that you will be charged 1.00% of the amount you have invested in the fund each year. While that may not sound like much, even a fee of 0.50% can result in hundreds of thousands of dollars in fees over a lifetime of investing. Generally, fees above 0.25% for an index fund or 0.75% for an actively managed fund are considered too high.
  • Limited investment options. Some 401(k) plans will have a single fund available for each of several sectors. This may include a US growth fund, a foreign market growth fund, a bond fund, a money market fund, and maybe two or three sector funds. The plan may also invest with a single mutual fund family, where you don’t find many attractive options. While the number of funds by itself is not critical, having limited options combined with high fees is a problem.
  • No- or low-employer match. One of the biggest attractions of any 401(k) plan is the employer matching contribution. But if your employer does not offer a match, or if the match isn’t particularly generous, it lowers the attractiveness of the plan.

If your plan has any of these limits, it’s almost certainly a bad 401(k) plan. You can do your best to make the most of it, but you will have to consider other options to compensate for the weaknesses in the plan.

Talk to Your Employer

The first step should be to talk to your HR department. Particularly when it comes to investment options and fees, employers often want to know if employees are happy with the retirement plan. Changes may not occur quickly, if at all. But it doesn’t hurt to ask.

Contribute Enough to Get the Maximum Employer Match

If your 401(k) plan is wanting, then you’ll probably want to limit the amount of money that you put into it. Still, if your employer does offer a match, you should contribute at least enough to get the maximum match. For example, if your employer offers a 50% match up to 3%, then you should contribute 6% of your pay to the plan, in order to get the full 3%.

That match is found money, and you should never ignore it. In addition, the match will turn a 6% contribution into a 9% contribution. That’s always worth pursuing, even if the investment options are lacking.

Choose the Investment Options with the Lowest Fees

If your 401(k) plan charges high fees, favor the investment options that have the lowest fees. And if there are transaction costs, it should go without saying that you should not actively trade the account. You will have to view your investments within the 401(k) as mostly static positions.

Of course, you’ll have to balance out the fee situation with the quality of the investments you purchase. A high-performing investment with high fees may be preferable to a low-performing investment with low fees.

Set up a Traditional or Roth IRA

Perhaps the best solution to a bad 401(k) plan is to invest outside the plan. The best option is through an IRA, either traditional or Roth. An IRA is a self-directed plan, which means you can choose the trustee where the plan will be held. You can choose an investment brokerage firm that will offer the widest investment selection at low fees. And you can contribute up to a set limit that can change each year (see the current limits here).

Even if your income is too high to get a tax deduction on a contribution to a traditional IRA, it will still be worth putting money into an account. In addition to the fact that you will be gaining self-directed investing for the plan, nondeductible contributions to an IRA will reduce your tax liability in retirement. And the investment earnings will still accumulate on a tax-deferred basis.

A Roth IRA serves the same purpose. While the contributions are never deductible, qualified withdrawals are tax-free. A Roth has the same annual contribution limits as a traditional IRA.

Set Up a Self-employed Retirement Plan if You Have a Side Business

If you have a side business, you can set up a retirement plan for that business. There are various options available.

The SEP IRA is a common self-employed retirement plan. However, it tends to work best for people with higher business income. The SEP effectively limits your contributions to 20% of your business earnings. This can be quite generous if your business earns $100,000 and you can make a $20,000 contribution. But if your side business earns $10,000, you will be limited to a $2,000 contribution.

Better options would be either a Solo 401(k) or a SIMPLE IRA. Each allows you to contribute 100% of your income up to the plan limit. In the case of the solo 401(k) plan, the maximum contribution is $18,000, or $24,000 if you are 50 or older (these limits can change from year to year). You can also make an employer match of effectively 20% of your total business earnings.

The SIMPLE IRA has a maximum contribution of $12,500, or $15,500, if you are 50 or older (again, these limits can change each year). The maximum contribution isn’t as generous as it is for either the SEP IRA or the solo 401(k). But if your business earnings are within those contribution limits, it can be a good plan to have.

If you do have a self-employed retirement account, the combination of contributions to that account, plus your employer plan, cannot exceed $54,000 per year, or $60,000 per year if you are 50 or older. Both totals include the employer match and also can change each year.

Invest in Taxable Accounts

This can be an especially good strategy if your income is too high to make a tax-deductible contribution to a traditional IRA or to participate in a Roth IRA plan. You can simply save money in taxable investment accounts in addition to your employer-sponsored 401(k) plan.

There’s no tax deduction for making contributions to taxable accounts, nor do you have the benefit of tax-deferred investment income. But that also opens up the possibility of having tax-free income in retirement. That is, you will be able to make withdrawals from your taxable accounts without having to pay income tax on the amount of those withdrawals. (Of course, the income you earn on taxable accounts will always be subject to income tax in the year earned.)

As you can see from this list, you are not without options if you have a bad 401(k) at work. Participate in the plan at some minimal level, but maintain the bulk of your retirement assets in other accounts.

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In your personal finance journey, you may or may not have come across peer-to-peer (P2P) lending platforms. The great news is, these have proven to be solid investments over the past few years, providing much higher returns than what you could earn on bank investments. But we have to wonder:  will P2P platforms continue to be reliable investments, particularly if the economy begins to weaken?

p2p

Since P2P lending only got its start in the early 2000s, we don’t have a particularly strong or reliable track record to fall back on. The first platforms only began coming on line as the last recession – the Financial Meltdown – was unfolding. So while they have been a picture of success since their inception, we don’t really know how they’ll hold up under pressure.

What Effect a Weakening Economy Might have on P2P Lending

In the absence of any substantial performance data from the last recession, we can only speculate what effect a weak economy will have on P2P lending. But we can rely on the general performance of loans in past recessions for strong clues.

When the economy declines, asset prices fall and unemployment rises. In turn, default rates on virtually all types of loans rise. Since P2P loans are unsecured and taken for a variety of purposes, they most closely relate to credit cards.

According to the Federal Reserve, credit card default rates were at 2.34% at the end of 2016. However, they hit a high of 6.77% during the second quarter of 2009, in the middle of the Financial Meltdown.

While P2P loans are priced to accommodate certain default levels, they are based on the most recent default experience. Should default rates rise to something close to what they were in 2009, P2P loans priced based on today’s default rates will likely suffer disproportionate losses in interest rate return.

The Flood of Institutional Money Might Weaken Lending Standards

The basic concept of P2P lending is simple. Individual borrowers come to lending sites in search of loans, which will ultimately be funded by individual investors. But as interest rates have continued low, institutional participation in P2P lending has grown, as banks and other large lenders seek higher returns. For example, Lending Club recently reported that banks funded 31% of loan originations in the fourth quarter of 2016, compared with 13% in the third quarter.

One of the concerns over increased institutional participation is loan quality. As institutions bring larger amounts of capital into the space, loan quality may decline. That can happen as P2P lenders lower underwriting standards in order to draw in a larger number of loans. As they do, the quality of those loans will gradually decline, eventually increasing the rate of default.

It remains to be seen if that will play out as a worst-case scenario. However, not only is the industry itself relatively new, but institutional participation is only very recent. That means that the impact of greater institutional participation has yet to be felt.

Lending Club’s 2016 Scandal

In May of 2016, Lending Club’s CEO, Renaud Laplanche, was forced to resign amid a scandal. A summary of the event disclosed that:

Lending Club conducted a review, under the supervision of a sub-committee of the board of directors and with the assistance of independent outside counsel and other advisors, regarding non-conforming sales to a single, accredited institutional investor of $22 million of near-prime loans. The loans in question failed to conform to the investor’s express instructions as to a non-credit and non-pricing element. Certain personnel apparently were aware that the sale did not meet the investor’s criteria…The review further discovered another matter unrelated to the sale of the loans, involving a failure to inform the board’s Risk Committee of personal interests held in a third party fund while the Company was contemplating an investment in the same fund.

Since Laplanche’s resignation, earnings have gone negative three quarters in a row. What’s more, the pattern of losses are expected to continue through 2017. The company is forecasting losses of $69 million to $84 million, on revenue in the range of $565 million to $595 million for the year. The company cites the loss of investors in the aftermath of last year’s scandal.

We should reasonably expect that Lending Club, as the largest platform in the P2P space, will recover. However the episode should serve as a warning that the development of P2P lending won’t necessarily be an elevator ride straight up. With the number of P2P lenders increasing steadily, there are bound to be more negative surprises.

Read More About Reducing Risk With Lending Club here.

That might make a strong case for spreading your P2P investments across several lending platforms.

The Nature of P2P Loans Themselves

Despite the positive overall performance of P2P lending over the past few years, the practice contains two built-in issues.

The first is the fact that the loans are largely comprised of debt consolidation loans. Though such a loan can potentially improve a borrower’s financial situation by lowering the interest rate and monthly payment that he or she is paying, it also holds the potential to borrow even more money.

For example, many borrowers engage in serial debt consolidation. They have a few credit cards, and then do a debt consolidation to lower the monthly payment. But one or two years into the debt consolidation, and they rack up more credit cards. Eventually, there’s another debt consolidation – and maybe even a third, and a fourth.

From a risk standpoint, the problem is that the borrower is never actually paying off debt. Often, the debt consolidation simply sets the stage for the next round of borrowing. As that cycle continues, the risk of default on the latest debt consolidation loan increases.

The second major concern is that most P2P loans are unsecured. Borrowers can typically take loans as high as $40,000, and for nearly any purpose, without having to put up any collateral. In the event of a loan default, there will be no assets to seize in order to satisfy the debt.

In an economy with low unemployment, low interest rates, and rising asset prices, neither issue is a major concern. But when the economy eventually weakens, both run more than a slight chance of becoming more pronounced.

Positioning Your P2P Portfolio for Leaner Times

All of this should be a reminder that P2P lending, like virtually all other types of investing, is not completely risk-free. And despite recent healthy performance, the situation could change — and change dramatically — in the event of an economic slowdown.

None of this is to discourage investing in P2P lending. Since the next recession is virtually inevitable, though, now is the time to prepare your investments for a change in circumstances.

Prepare Now: Sweat In Up Markets So You Don’t Bleed In Down Markets

How can you protect yourself?

  • As noted earlier, consider investing on several P2P lending platforms. That will minimize the risks associated with any one platform.
  • Don’t use P2P investing as a substitute for the fixed income portion of your portfolio. Instead, make it part of your fixed income investments, to offset and increase the lower rates paid on traditional but safer fixed income investments. You should have both P2P and traditional fixed income investments.
  • Invest across various risk grades, despite the fact that returns may be higher on the weaker grades. Lending Club’s Statistics page (“Loan Performance Details” chart) shows that default rates increase substantially with each lower credit grade.

In regard to the last item in particular, it’s important to realize that default rates are likely to increase more dramatically in the lower credit grades in the face of a bad economy. Those are, after all, the highest risk loans being made.

We don’t have much information available as to how well P2P investing performed in the last recession. But that makes it even more important, at this late stage of the current economic recovery, to make some reasonable assumptions about what’s likely to play out. This will allow us to best prepare for it.

How do you think P2P investing will do when the economy takes the next nosedive?

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A Review of the Personal Capital Financial Advisory Dashboard

by Kevin Mercadante

Looking for a way to simplify how you manage your finances, from your spending to your credit cards to your investments? Personal Capital’s financial dashboard may be just the tool for you. This all-around financial management tool is easy to use, tracks all of your financial information, and offers investment advising, to boot. The free […]

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Think Only the Rich Have Accounts at Goldman Sachs? Think Again

by Kevin Mercadante

You’re probably familiar with Goldman Sachs, at some level. The multinational banking firm, best known for investment banking, goes all the way back to 1869. But did you know that they also have a web-based arm known as Goldman Sachs Bank USA, or simply GS Bank? It’s an online bank that pays far higher rates […]

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Can Betterment Portfolios Earn You An Extra 15 Percent?

by Kevin Mercadante

What if you could increase your after-tax investment returns by 15 percent over 30 years? Betterment is claiming you can do just that with their Tax-Coordinated Portfolio. What’s more, they claim that it can even work across several accounts at the same time. Interested? Read on… Who is Betterment? Betterment is a robo-advisor. In fact, it […]

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An Overview of The CFPB Mortgage Protection Rules

by Kevin Mercadante

Beginning in January 2014, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, or CFPB, issued new rules to protect mortgage borrowers. The rules deal primarily with what is known as the “servicing” side of the mortgage process. That’s everything that happens after a mortgage closes, from setting up escrows and crediting payments to foreclosures. There are nine rules […]

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