How to Afford Healthcare in Retirement

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Last updated on July 1, 2018 Views: 547 Comments: 1

Retirement is a huge financial undertaking, as we all know. It requires plenty of planning to ensure that all of your needs will be met once your career, and working income, ends. It needs to be able to cover your costs of living, some fun money to actually enjoy your years, and expenses such as healthcare. Of course, the latter become becomes even more important as we age, but many seem to overlook the magnitude of this expense in their planning.

The average person between the ages of 55 and 74 with retirement savings has only $104,000 to $148,000 tucked away in a defined benefit account. What’s even more concerning is that this statistic only reflects 48% of American households. The rest of them have no retirement savings at all.

Those with retirement savings tend to also have other resources to depend on, such as non-retirement investment accounts. On the other hand, those without retirement savings tend to have less of those resource, too.

What does this mean for costs associated with retirement? It means that many Americans will struggle to afford to retire at the standard age of 65. And those who do will have trouble meeting their monthly expenses, including health care.

In fact, 74% of married partners said they worry about unexpected medical costs in retirement. With the cost of health care in retirement being such a big concern, it’s important to consider the actual numbers and plan accordingly.

How Much Does Health Care Cost In Retirement?

According to a 2015 study conducted by Fidelity, a couple, both aged 65, can expect to spend about $245,000 on health care during their retirement. That’s over $12,000 a year — or $1,000 a month — based on average life expectancy!

Why is this so expensive? When you factor in copays, out-of-pocket costs, and dental and vision care, you’ll easily see how the numbers add up quickly. That’s exclusive of any insurance premiums, too.

Speaking of health insurance, here’s a breakdown of how insurance provided by the government works:

Medicare 
Medicare Part AAs long as you or your spouse paid Medicare taxes while working, you won’t have to pay a premium for this coverage.
Hospital InsuranceIt mainly covers hospital inpatient care, skilled nursing facility care, hospice care, and home health care.
Medicare Part BMost people will pay $104.90 per month.
Medical InsuranceIt mainly covers services from doctors, outpatient care, durable medical equipment, and some preventive services.
Medicare Part CMonthly premium varies greatly, but can be up to $200 per month.
Medicare Advantage PlusIt mainly covers everything in Parts A and B and is run by Medicare-approved private insurance companies.
Medicare Part DMonthly premium varies greatly, but can be up to $100 per month.
Prescription Drug CoverageIt mainly helps cover the cost of prescription drugs.

As you can see, if you opt for all parts of government-provided medical insurance, you can pay up to $400 in monthly premiums per person. This is exclusive of the other costs associated with health care as mentioned above: copays, out-of-pocket expenses, and auxiliary care.

There are ways plan for these expenses, however. The main thing you can do is start saving early.

How To Plan For Health Care Costs In Retirement

Your first plan of attack should be your employer’s retirement account, if one is offered. According to the American Benefits Council, nearly 80% of full-time workers have access to an employer-sponsored defined benefit account, such as a 401(k)/403(b). So if you’re one of many offered this benefit, make sure you take advantage.

Saving even just a small percentage of your salary will make a big difference if you start early. You can begin by saving a mere 3% of your salary, then gradually increase your contributions until you reach 10%. This is generally considered the target amount to save.

This is just a recommendation though. If you can contribute even more, by all means do so.

If you max out your 401(k)/403(b) by contributing $18,000 in 2016 ($24,000, if over the age of 50), investing in an individual retirement account (IRA) is a great next step. Although the annual contribution limit for IRA’s and Roth IRA’s is much lower than that of 401(k)s/403(b)s, the extra savings will help you cover cost of your future health care.

Lastly, saving money in a Health Savings Account (HSA) is a great way to plan for covering medical expenses in retirement. If you are currently enrolled in a high-deductible health insurance plan, you are eligible to contribute to an HSA.

HSAs offer a triple tax benefit. First, HSA contributions are tax deductible. Second, the interest earned on money in an HSA is tax-free. Third, you can withdraw money from your HSA for qualified medical expenses tax-free, as well.

HSAs can be considered retirement funds because there is no carry-over limit, unlike Flexible Spending Accounts. So, the money you contribute today can be used for health care costs in retirement years later.

How To Offset Health Care Costs Once In Retirement

In today’s economic environment, retirement doesn’t necessarily meaning relaxing on sandy beaches. The unfortunate reality is that many people must continue to work in order to supplement Social Security and their minimal retirement savings.

Working a part-time job during the early years of retirement can greatly offset the cost of health care. In fact, you could even save some of your earnings from your part-time job and put it into a retirement savings account to use in future years.

Here are a few ideas of part-time jobs you can take up that won’t be taxing on your health:

  • Consultant: Transfer all the skills you accumulated from your day job over the years and use those expertise to help other companies accomplish their goals.
  • Freelancer: Use your talents to do one-off assignments for businesses. This could include graphic design, writing, proofreading, and much more.
  • Blogging: It can take a while to make money from a blog. But once you get the ball rolling, this gig can bring in a lot of income.

Other Things To Consider

Aside from Medicare, Social Security, and your retirement savings, there may be other ways to cover the cost of health care in retirement.

One thing to consider is COBRA. Under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act, federal law requires that companies with more than 20 employees give them the option to continue receiving coverage under the employer’s health plan for at least 18 months.

With COBRA, however, you’ll be responsible for the entire cost of the health plan. While working, your employer likely paid for a large percentage of the premium. This expense will be wholly your responsibility with COBRA.

You may want to consider continuing your employer’s health plan before enrolling in Medicare. Your employer’s health plan will likely cover more medical expenses.

On that note, if you want a more comprehensive health insurance plan after your COBRA benefits end, you can consider enrolling in a Marketplace health insurance plan. If you don’t enroll in Medicare, you may qualify for lower out-of-pocket costs and premium tax credits. You could also use the two in combination; but you won’t receive the same tax credits for the Marketplace health insurance plan.

Wrapping Up

There is a lot to consider on the topic of health care costs in retirement. If you’re young, the lesson here is to start saving early, because the cost of health insurance and medical care is only increasing. If you’re approaching retirement age, you may want to consider working part-time during your early retirement years, in order to offset the costs of health care. And if you’re already retired, it wouldn’t hurt to tuck away any extra money each month, in case unexpected health concerns pop up.

How are you planning to cover your health care expenses in retirement? Is it a big concern to you yet?

Article comments

1 comment
Wayne says:

Isn’t it expected that one would enroll in Medicare once eligible and if one enrolls in MC, is a Marketplace Health Insurance plan still an option or is it similar to the Affordable Care Act which is not available to MC enrollees