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Start the Decade Off Right: Pay Off Debt

This article was written by in Debt Reduction. 5 comments.


Welcome to the 10s! It is unlikely this year will resemble Arthur C. Clarke’s classic science fiction novel. Rather than preparing for contact with intelligent life from another world, we could prepare for the coming years by making sure we have the tools and attitude for financial success.

Here is one way to start the decade off right: pay off debt.

Paying off debt is one of the top new year’s resolutions but resolving to get out of debt is not enough. To be successful, a plan is necessary, and that plan should be more than just the Debt Avalanche, Debt Snowball, or other methods for prioritizing your debt. The most important part of getting out of debt is identifying and solving the root cause. Simply paying off your balances solves the symptoms, but might not affect the underlying condition that is causing the problem.

People find themselves in debt for different reasons. The most talked-about cause for getting into debt is excessive spending. Here is what happens when you spend more than you earn. If your family’s income is $4,000 per month but you spend $5,000 per month, your net worth decreases every month. You can pay part of debt from your income but if you pay off more, it has to come from your savings. Once your savings is depleted you have no choice but to continue adding debt at a faster rate.

Furthermore, if you pay only the minimum balances on your credit cards, either by choice or by necessity, while still adding to your debt load, you simply will not be able to get out of debt until you change your behavior.

Spending money whether it’s to buy products, experience the best of what life has to offer, or to feed a psychological or physiological habit like drug addiction can be dangerous because for some people, it creates a good feeling. We’re designed to seek out anything that causes us to feel good, some individuals more than others. Spending itself can become a physiological habit like a drug. To solve this underlying cause, where spending it an addiction, it’s helpful to talk with a psychologist or other doctor.

In other situations, a family can find itself in debt if a source of income disappears. The loss of a job can be devastating to financial stability. For a family with one income source, when the one person generating income loses a job and can’t replace the income with a new job right away, the family must live off savings for a time. In today’s economy, many people are having hard times finding jobs, so this situation could last a long time.

When a sole job is lost, consider two things. All adults of working age in the family could look for ways to earn income even if the former sole income provider has to take a lesser job while looking for one that would fully restore income. Also, find ways to reduce living expenses.

Two-income families have a buffer. For these families, the chance of losing all income at the same time is lower than the chance for one-income families. Regardless, when there are bills to pay every month, the income needs to be there.

Another reason for getting into unmanageable debt is an expensive emergency. Medical bills, particularly when insurance won’t cover a necessary procedure, can be the cause of debt even for families who are otherwise financially capable. Sometimes, medical debt can be avoided with a solid cash emergency fund, but let’s be clear: If you are involved in a major accident after being laid off from your job and COBRA coverage has expired, or if you haven’t been able to get your own insurance coverage due to a pre-existing condition, no normal emergency fund is going to cover your $500,000 hospital bill.

You have options, such as negotiating with the hospital and looking towards charitable funds that help in these situations. Even when these options have been exhausted, you could still be saddled with several hundred thousand dollars of debt. In cases like these, the medical emergency is the root cause of debt, and theoretically an individual can return to proper financial health if the massive debt can be paid off.

Once the root causes of your debt are recognized, acknowledged, and solved, the actual process of paying off debt will be much more successful.

This article is part of a series called Start the Decade Off Right on Consumerism Commentary.

Photo credit: bartificial

Updated September 14, 2011 and originally published January 1, 2010. If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the RSS feed or receive daily emails. Follow @ConsumerismComm on Twitter and visit our Facebook page for more updates.

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About the author

Luke Landes is the founder of Consumerism Commentary. He has been blogging and writing for the internet since 1995 and has been building online communities since 1991. Find out more about Luke Landes and follow him on Twitter. View all articles by .

{ 5 comments… read them below or add one }

avatar Arturo

Paying off debt can be one of the best resolutions to start every year or decade project, completed to “finally” make a budget, save for retirement and “definitely” spend less than you earn. There are lots of strategies to paying off debt but all of them do begin with this same first step: “stop acquiring new debt”, which surely stop the cycle and permit you to begin to see the numbers going down. Getting you the possibility to pay your debt has to do with reduce your expenses by budgeting or at least create a spending plan every month that consider your actual income and most important stick to it by sacrificing some “wants” to obtain a goal, which finally will be the big frame of all of this: put your finances in order !!! At that moment you will be living a more enjoyable and fulfilled life.

Thanks a lot for permitting me read you every day through your blog.

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avatar Jeff

Paying off debt is a great resolution. I just hope that when someone makes that resolution they can put the time and energy into completing it. It’s not easy to pay off debt, it takes a ton of work. I’m sad to say that not many people are willing to make the sacrifice.

I totally agree that paying off debt only fixes the symptom. If someone can’t come to grips with the fact that they MUST spend less than they make, they are doomed to fail.

Happy New Year, Let’s have a great 2010

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avatar Debt Kid

The great thing about paying off debt…..it’s feels fantastic! I know every time I knock another debt off, it’s like I lost 10lbs.

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avatar tigernicole86 ♦55 (Newbie)

Right now, my only huge bit of debt are my student loans. I got lucky with a car that was a present from my grandma(literally drop it only about 100/miles a week and then left it alone when she went to Florida) but I’m hoping to pay off at least 15% of my loans this year. Make it a little easier in the long run. :)

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avatar wylerassociate ♦162 (Cent)

I paid off 2 cards and my student loan so I was very happy that I reached my financial goals for 2010.

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