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Saving for retirement is a long game, but the idea of preparing for something decades away is counterintuitive for many of us.

However, consistent saving is crucial for retirement planning. Here’s expert advice for how to prepare in your 30s, 40s and 50s.

Your 30s

Saving for retirement really should begin in earnest during your 20s. But with the average college debt now soaring to more than $35,000, saving money early is out of reach for many recent graduates.

In your 30s, your career and income likely will grow but so will your financial responsibilities, which makes this a critical time to kick-start your retirement savings. If you didn’t begin in the previous decade, ramp up your savings and put away at least 10 percent of your earnings each pay period into a company-sponsored 401(k), traditional IRA or a Roth IRA that you open on your own. Also take advantage of any company match to maximize your retirement savings.

“The younger you start, the better,” says Bruce Elfenbein, a retirement planning expert and president of SecuRetirement Incorporated in South Florida. “There’s no substitute for compound interest and the effect it has. It’s incredible how a small contribution can turn into a great deal of money down the road.”

Elfenbein says you also should sign up for a permanent life insurance policy, establish an emergency fund and save four to six months worth of expenses. He recommends a money market account for this purpose, because it often pays a higher interest rate than a typical savings account.

Your 40s

In your 40s, it’s crucial to focus on increasing your contributions and the best way to do this is to pay off any debt.

Student loan and mortgage debt is one thing, but high-interest credit card debt can cripple your long-term financial plans. Pay off as much of it as you can and reallocate these funds to retirement. Also spend more time managing your portfolio. Talk to a financial planner and review your investments and savings to ensure your money is in the right vehicles and aligns with a level of risk you’re comfortable with.

Elfenbein says it’s important to put money in vehicles, like a fixed-index annuity, that will give you secure and guaranteed income. A fixed-index annuity provides tax-deferred growth and can protect you from downturns in the market. Anything left over should be invested to combat taxes and inflation, Elfenbein adds.

In your 40s, also consider how much you need to cover your health care expenses in retirement. If you haven’t already, open a Health Savings Account (HSA) to save for this cost. HSAs are a great option (link to previous article here) because any contributions you make are tax deductible and roll over from year-to-year.

Your 50s

In your 50s, your retirement strategy should “shift from accumulation to preservation,” Elfenbein says. People tend to become more risk-averse as they age, and this is no different as you approach retirement. In this decade, stay away from variable products and shift more of your money away from stocks and into secure vehicles like high-quality bonds or annuities.

Also use the savings options the government provides — like a 401(k) or IRA — to make catch-up contributions that will maximize your retirement income. In 2016, you can contribute $6,000 above IRS limits for 401(k) plans.

If you’ve already started funding an HSA, look into insurance plans for long-term care, which can help cover your ongoing health care, assisted living or nursing home costs later in life.

When it comes to retirement planning, the main question you need to ask is what kind of lifestyle do you want to live in your later years? If you expect to maintain or exceed your current standard of living, you need to save more — and start early. Being consistent and actively managing your portfolio will pave the way for a secure retirement.

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If travel is in your plans, you may want to know about this offer from American Express. It’s the Starwood Preferred Guest Credit Card, and it offers 25,000 bonus points when you make $3,000 in purchases in the first three months after opening your account.

You can redeem those points for free nights when it works for you because there are no blackout dates at over 1,200 Starwood hotels and resorts in almost 100 countries. (Some hotels may have mandatory service charges and resort charges.) For international travelers, though, it’s a big plus that there are no foreign transaction fees. You can stay connected with free in-room premium Internet access, but booking requirements apply. Other perks give you access to discounts and presale tickets for live events as well.

After the introductory period, your travel and everyday purchases continue to help you earn travel rewards too. You can get up to 5 points for every dollar you spend at Starwood hotels and 1 point on all other purchases. The offer includes a $0 introductory annual fee for the first year and goes to $95 per year after that. Terms and conditions apply.

This card was voted one of the best travel credit cards in CardRating’s Editor’s Choice Awards: Best Credit Cards for 2016 article. (CardRatings.com is one of our partner sites. Here is CardRating’s full review.)

Another travel reward card offer

The Chase Sapphire Preferred Card was also honored in the CardRating.com Editor’s Choice Awards article for its introductory offer – 50,000 bonus points when you spend $4,000 on purchases within the first three months of opening your account. (That translates to $625 in travel rewards.)

With the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card, you earn two times the points on travel and dining. You earn one point for each dollar spent on all other purchases.

It seems that turning your everyday purchases into better travel experiences is getting easier – and there are a number of options to choose from to boot. Happy trails!

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Tax Day 2016 for IRS Tax Year 2015, also known as your return filing deadline, is April 18.

If you haven’t yet filed, here are the IRS tax rates for your 2015 earnings with background and commentary. These change from year to year to protect against something the Tax Foundation calls “bracket creep” or when you get bumped up based on inflation not because you got a nice raise or found a higher-earning job.

Curious who will pay the most for tax year 2015? The top marginal rate is 39.6%.

Looking for your federal refund status? If you’ve already filed you can use this part of the IRS website to check.

What are the 2015 marginal tax rates?

The following was written by Luke Landes and edited by Consumerism Commentary for length and clarity.

There’s a big misconception about taxes. People are afraid to earn more if it means they’re going to be “bumped into the next tax bracket.” It is not true that being in a higher tax bracket will cause all of your income to be taxed at a higher rate. The only income tax at the highest rate is the income you earn above and beyond the lower threshold for that rate.

Make sure that sinks in. You will always owe the lowest tax rate, 10 percent, on your first $9,225 of earned income if you file as a single individual (not filing jointly). You could be a CEO earning $5 million this year, but even still, your first $9,225 is taxed at 10 percent. That’s how the brackets work.

So if your total taxable income is $9,000, you owe 10 percent of that, or $900. In this case, your marginal tax rate, 10 percent, is exactly the same as your effective tax rate. You get your effective tax rate by dividing the amount of total tax you owe over your total income. This is what Warren Buffett has famously referred to when explaining how his secretary pays more tax than he does. Buffett earns a lot of income from investments which are taxed at a lower rate than earned income, and that smaller percentage affects the average — the effective tax rate for all his income.

One more thing to keep in mind is that if you are employed and your employer takes tax payments from your paycheck automatically, you pay your 2015 tax bill throughout the year. The total tax you owe when you file your tax return takes that into account. If your total tax bill is less than what you’ve paid to the federal government throughout the year, you’ll get a refund. If you haven’t covered your entire bill through paycheck withholding, you owe the government.

The 2015 federal income marginal tax rates and brackets by filing status.

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Cash back credit cards can help consumers practice responsible spending while earning a little extra for their efforts when used properly. The days of earning 5 percent cash back for all credit card purchases may be just a memory, but the smart use of credit cards can still be profitable for diligent consumers. You may be able to find some credit cards offering a high level of cash back in certain spending categories, but these are often subject to maximums.

Most of today’s better cash back credit cards offer 1 percent to 2 percent cash back on purchases. However, if you look hard enough, you’ll find a number of credit cards with higher cash rebates. Keep in mind that in order to make credit card with rewards programs worthwhile, you must pay your bill on time and in full every single month to avoid interest charges and late fees.

This ever-changing list reflects the best cash back credit cards currently available. Weighing in with his expert feedback is Curtis Arnold, CardRatings.com founder and editor in chief, and nationally recognized consumer educator and advocate. Want to learn more about any of the cards listed below? Click through below to read Arnold’s full reviews of these top cards, see CardRatings.com Cash Back Credit Card Comparison Table or visit the CardRatings.com list of hand-picked list of best cash back credit cards.

Editor’s choice

Discover It® CardDiscover it® Card-Double Cash Back your first year – CardRatings.com review. Discover® recently announced a tempting offer for anyone considering a new cash-back card— they’ll double all the cash back you’ve earned at the end of your first year automatically on this card. This offer is only intended for new cardmembers and is only available for a limited time. That applies to the 5 percent cash back in quarterly categories as well as the 1 percent cash back on all other purchases. With the new New Freeze It® on/off switch, you can prevent new purchases, cash advances and balance transfers on misplaced cards in seconds by mobile app and online. You can also get your free FICO® Credit Score on statements, online and by mobile app, and will pay no annual fee or foreign transaction fees.

Other cards

Chase Freedom Visa cardChase Freedom®. See the issuer for terms, but Chase is offering a $150 bonus for new cardmembers. You can earn this bonus after spending only $500 on purchases within the first three months of owning the card.

Besides this bonus, Chase Freedom® offers 5% total cash back on up to $1,500 in combined purchases in bonus categories each quarter you activate. All other purchases (purchases in other categories or purchases in the 5% category beyond $1,500) earn 1% cash back. It’s automatic! There are new 5% categories every 3 months like gas stations, restaurants, select grocery stores, and wholesale clubs. Cash back rewards never expire as long as your account is open. It’s free and simple to activate your bonus each quarter.

Chase Freedom® has a 0% intro APR for 15 months on purchases and balance transfers. Its ongoing APR is 14.24% – 23.24% variable. The balance transfer fee is 5% of the amount transferred, $5 minimum. And the cash advance APR is 25.24% variable, but a cash advance fee of either $10 or 5% of the amount of each transfer (whichever is greater) applies.

So while the most you can earn from the 5% bonus cash back rate is $75, your cash back at the 1% rate is unlimited. Plus, Chase Freedom® carries no annual fee.

Fidelity Investment Rewards Visa Signature Card. Fidelity’s card is regularly cited as a Consumerism Commentary readers’ favorite. For the first $15,000 you spend on this card in a year, you will earn 1.5 points. After you hit the $15,000 threshold, each dollar will earn 2 points. Every time you pass 5,000 points, Fidelity will deposit $50 into your account.

This card requires a linked account at Fidelity, but these accounts are free and can be good choices for savers and investors. A few years ago, I chose to rollover a former company’s 401(k) into a Fidelity IRA, and I use Fidelity as the servicing company for my charitable gift fund. Their index mutual funds are some of the lowest cost in the business, but for most of my own investing I prefer Vanguard. Vanguard, however, does not offer a similar credit card offer.

Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express. I recommend this card as the one whose bonus categories are most likely to overlap the spending habits of parents. Special offer – get up to $300 back. Offer ends June 15, 2016. Get 6% cash back on groceries at U.S. supermarkets up to $6,000 per year in purchases (then 1%), 3% cash back at U.S. gas stations, and 3% cash back at select U.S. department stores. (That’s where I spend all my money!) And 1% on other purchases. Terms and limitations apply. With the Blue Cash Everyday® Card, you can get cash back. No rotating reward categories. No enrollment required. Cash back is received in the form of Reward Dollars that can be redeemed as a statement credit. You can only get cash back on eligible purchases. And there is no annual fee. Terms and restrictions apply. Compare this card with others in its category and apply here.

Capital One® Quicksilver® Cash Rewards. The basic offer for Quicksilver Cash Rewards from Capital One® is a 1.5% rate of cash back on every purchase with no limit. If you are approved and open this card, Capital One® currently offers a one-time $100 cash bonus if you spend at least $500 on purchases within the first three months. Compare this card with others in its category and apply here.

Capital One® is also offering an introductory interest rate of 0% on purchases and balance transfers until September 2016. Balance transfers carry a fee of 3% of the transferred balance. You’ll need good to excellent credit to be considered for this credit card which carries no annual membership fee and no foreign transaction fees.

Discover it® Chrome. With Discover it® Chrome, you can earn 1% cash back on every purchase, but Discover® offers an opportunity to earn double cash back on certain categories. The double cash back is limited to $1,000 in combined purchases, though, which adds up to only $100 extra. Still, that’s $100 you wouldn’t have otherwise.

The categories for double cash back with Discover it® Chrome are gas stations and restaurants. In order to make using the cash back points even easier, Discover® allows you to pay for items on Amazon.com using points instead of dollars. That could come in handy during the holiday seasons.

Ink Cash® Business Credit Card. Yes, this is a business card, but sole proprietors can open an account too. Not only is this a good cash back card, but it’s the card I recently chose to open for a side business. Chase is currently offering new customers a $200 account cash back bonus after you spend $3,000 on purchases across the first three months from account opening.

Beyond the opening bonus, Chase offers cardholders 5% cash back on purchases at office supply stores, telephone (mobile and landline) payments, and cable and internet bills, up to a total of $25,000 in combined purchases each account anniversary year. The next tier is a 2% cash back rate on combined purchases up to $25,000 at gas stations and restaurants each account anniversary year. These bonus cash back tiers include points that aren’t added to your account until the anniversary of your card opening, so that’s a little inconvenient.

Otherwise, all other purchases earn an unlimited 1% cash back. Always see issuer’s terms regarding APR.

If you’re holding on to a cash back credit card that you feel deserves to make this list, let me know by leaving your thoughts in the comments below. If the offer is good, I’ll add it to this best cash back credit cards list.

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Best Time to Buy a House

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Balance Transfer Cards for Fair, Average or Excellent Credit

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Are you still wrestling down holiday debt? Zero-interest balance transfer credit card offers can help you meet this challenge, but only if you know what to look for. Otherwise, you will end up paying interest anyway, which is exactly what the credit card companies hope will happen. Time to pay the piper According to a ... Continue reading this article…

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Best Online Savings Accounts March 2016

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Retirement Planning and Advice

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